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Public Affairs — Page 4

Conserving Biodiverse ‘Slow Lanes’ in a Rapidly Changing World

By University of Massachusetts Amherst 6/1/2020 The notion of conserving climate change refugia – areas relatively buffered from current climate change that shelter valued wildlife, ecosystems, and other natural resources – is only about 10 years old, but the field has matured enough that a leading journal has prepared a special issue on the topic. It offers “a look back…

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Scientists pinpoint areas in boreal forests that offer refuge to plants and animals as climate gets warmer and drier

By University of Alberta 6/1/2020 North America’s boreal forests are warming and drying from climate change, but they still hold places that can offer refuge for plants and animals, according to University of Alberta scientists who have taken the lead in creating a guide to identify those areas. The information about these sheltered places known as climate-change refugia—including large lakes,…

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Changing Freshwater Flows Affect Fish Populations in the Potomac River

By USGS 4/3/2020 Millions of people rely on the Potomac River for drinking water and recreational opportunities. The Potomac is Maryland’s most popular freshwater fishing destination, and the second largest river that enters the Chesapeake Bay. Restoring fisheries is also an important goal for the Chesapeake Bay Partnership restoration efforts. The USGS worked with Maryland Department of Natural Resources (MD DNR)…

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Charismatic invasive species have an easier time settling into new habitats

By University of Córdoba 4/21/2020 An international study, in which the University of Cordoba participated, assessed the influence of charisma in the handling of invasive species and concluded that the perception people have of them can hinder our control over these species and condition their spread Charisma can launch professional success and improve leadership skills. It can make a difference…

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Oyster Farming and Shorebirds Likely Can Coexist

by Rutgers University 5/14/20 Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings, published in the journal Ecosphere, likely apply to other areas around the country including the West Coast and Gulf Coast, where oyster aquaculture…

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Climate Change Is Pushing Bird Boundaries, Community Scientists Confirm

By The National Audubon Society In the first peer-reviewed study of its kind, participants in Audubon’s Climate Watch program helped determine the ongoing impact of climate change to bluebirds and nuthatches. NEW YORK — Today, the journal Ecological Applications published a final version of a study from National Audubon Society scientists demonstrating that climate change is causing a measurable shift of birds’ ranges…

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Study reveals important flowering plants for city-dwelling honey bees

By Pennsylvania State University 4/28/2020 UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Trees, shrubs and woody vines are among the top food sources for honey bees in urban environments, according to an international team of researchers. By using honey bees housed in rooftop apiaries in Philadelphia, the researchers identified the plant species from which the honey bees collected most of their food, and…

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Prof. Julie Lockwood Elected 2020 Fellow of the Ecological Society of America

By Rutgers University Julie Lockwood, chair and professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, was elected a 2020 fellow of the Ecological Society of America (ESA). The society’s fellowship program recognizes the many ways in which its members contribute to ecological research and discovery, communication, education and pedagogy, and management and policy.   Lockwood’s research is helping to…

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Dramatic loss of food plants for insects

By University of Bonn (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn) 4/24/2020 Just a few weeks ago, everyone was talking about plummeting insect numbers. Academic discourse focused on three main causes: the destruction of habitats, pesticides in agriculture and the decline of food plants for insects. A team of researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest,…

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Deepwater charr, presumed extinct, reappears in Lake Constance

By Eawag – Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology 4/21/2020 In Lake Constance, Eawag scientists have tracked down a charr species thought to have gone extinct – a surprising rediscovery raising numerous questions. The deepwater charr Salvelinus profundus is a small, pale fish endemic to Lake Constance. With its large eyes and overbite, it is well adapted to life in…

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