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It's Time to Renew Your Membership

ESA members, we hope you had a great 2019 with us and look forward to connecting with you even more in 2020. And if you haven't been a member with us before, now is the perfect time to join for the year to come!

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Nominate a Colleague

Nominate a Colleague

Nominations are now open for the 2020 ESA Awards. ESA welcomes nominations that reflect the diversity of the Society’s members. Nominations are due Nov. 7!

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Your Vote, Your Voice

Your Vote, Your Voice

ESA's 2019 election is now open -- check your email for a message from "ESA Election Coordinator" at noreply@directvote.net.

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#ESA2020 in Salt Lake

#ESA2020 in Salt Lake

Proposals for workshops, short courses, special sessions, and field trips are due Thursday, November 21st at 5:00 PM Eastern (2:00 PM Pacific).

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News

  • Removing invasive mice will benefit stormpetrels through reduced owl predation

    By Nadav Nur 10/7/2019 We used Point Blue’s long-term data to examine the complex relationship between house mice, burrowing owls, and ashy storm-petrels on the Farallon Islands National Wildlife Refuge and to provide a quantitative estimate of the anticipated benefit to ashy storm-petrels from a proposed house mouse eradication project. Surveys by Point Blue biologists revealed a strongly seasonal pattern…

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  • MSU researchers make surprising wolf diet discovery, highlight ecosystem complexities

    By Sarah Nicholas, Mississippi State University 10/2/2019 STARKVILLE, Miss.—Mississippi State University researchers are shifting commonly held ideas about the diet of grey wolves in a newly published article gaining national attention. Published in the scientific journal “Ecology,” MSU assistant professor Brandon Barton’s Sept. 18 article “Grasshopper consumption by grey wolves and implications for ecosystems” details the unexpected effects of wolf reintroduction…

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  • Seed availability hampers forest recovery after wildfires

    By Trent Knoss, CU Boulder 10/2/2019 BOULDER, CO – A lack of tree seedling establishment following recent wildfires represents a crucial bottleneck limiting coniferous forest recovery in the western U.S., new CU Boulder-led research finds. The study, which was recently published in the journal Ecological Applications, examined burn-affected ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir stands in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico to better understand…

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Journals & Publications

  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    In the October issue of Ecological Applications, Graham et al. demonstrate that responses to land-use change differ among plants, small mammals, and large mammals in east Africa. Large mammals like the giraffe depend on conserved areas, while many small mammal and plant taxa exhibit affinities for pastoral and agricultural areas. This implies that mosaics of varying land-use are important for conserving diverse assemblages of organisms.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    In their research published in the August issue of Ecological Monographs, Nowicki et al. quantified impacts of widespread seagrass loss to tropical marine megafauna, revealing that marine heat waves during extreme climatic events can have dramatic indirect impacts to consumer species, even when they withstand the heat wave itself.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    Hettinger et al. introduce a new series in the ESA Bulletin, Human Dimensions. Future works in this series will highlight different ESA sections and chapters and the work they are doing to more tightly couple ecology to human systems, and to further goals of equity, inclusion, and diversity in the study of ecology. –Designing Instruction and Assessing Student Learning

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    In the September issue of Ecosphere, Grimm-Seyfarth et al. investigated the effects of food, predators, vegetation, and local and distant climate on a reptile community over the course of 30 years. The study findings suggest a highly complicated network rather than linear relations between climatic factors and biotic interactions, and, interestingly, the biotic or abiotic factor to which a species responded was determined by its functional traits, such as activity, habitat, body lengths, or longevity.

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  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Some types of human infrastructure, such as roads and railways, can facilitate seed dispersal, but pollution, habitat fragmentation, and other stressors that occur in urban areas can make it more difficult for plants to expand their populations. In the October issue of Frontiers, Piana et al. describe how conditions in cities can influence plant recruitment, and show how a better understanding of these conditions could improve urban ecosystem management.

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  • Ecology

    Ecology

    In the October issue of Ecology, Butterfield et al. show that as temperatures rose following the Last Glacial Maximum, some tall, vertebrate-dispersed desert species like the giant saguaro colonized newly suitable habitat 2,000–5,000 years faster than short species with no long-distance dispersal mechanisms.

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ESA is the nation's largest organization of professional ecologists. ESA membership is the best opportunity to network with scientists in all aspects of ecology. Membership is on a sliding scale based on income and country to help promote inclusion.