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This Virtual Meeting Has a Great Program

Thousands of talks and posters, career development, live Q&As and networking -- check out the program for #ESA2020!

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We Support Diverse Ecologists

We Support Diverse Ecologists

To give voice to the diverse community of scientists who make up ESA, we launched a new blog series on DEIJ in the sciences. Read the first post, and review these guidelines for how to submit your own story!

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ESA and COVID-19

ESA and COVID-19

Our COVID-19 pandemic resources are very much active as a way to support our members and community. We provide virtual events, peer-to-peer supports, education resources and much more.

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Strategies for Success

Strategies for Success

The COVID-19 pandemic presents diverse challenges for scientific resources and programs. Our online Strategies for Success course covers tools and skills to help you address these challenges head-on.

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Journals & Publications

  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Anthropogenic climate change is threatening biodiversity globally. The June edition of Frontiers is a themed, open-access, Special Issue focusing on climate-change refugia (areas buffered from climate-change effects over time). For instance, populations of plants like the encrusted saxifrage (Saxifraga paniculata) grow along the shores of Lake Superior where summer temperatures are moderated by the lake’s cold waters. By fostering conditions that are suitable for relict arctic-alpine plants, these microclimates may serve as climate-change refugia.

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  • Ecology

    Ecology

    Through combining long-term photo-identification with fine-scale movement patterns of individual sea turtles, Schofield et al. show that female sea turtles have better survival rates than males, possibly because males tend to occupy sites closer to shore, increasing interactions with anthropogenic threats. Their results are reported in the July issue of Ecology and show that long‐term identification, coupled with tracking, offers great promise for estimating the survival rates of other wide‐ranging species.

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    Spectacular fields of fireweed are often the first sign of a site that will transform to new dominance by deciduous trees following a severe burn, as they require the same seedbed conditions as wind-dispersed aspen and birch. New evidence from Johnstone et al. in the May issue of Ecosphere documents the persistent effects of these seedbed changes on early post-fire succession in burned black spruce forests in Alaska.

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  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    Although birds on farms commonly eat strawberries and other crops, research by Olimpi et al. published in the July issue of Ecological Applications revealed that birds also suppress invertebrate pests, which can be a greater threat to the berry production than the birds themselves.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    Elephants and other non-ruminants are estimated to have high water requirements, even when corrected for body size. In the May issue of Ecological Monographs, Kihwele et al. quantify the water requirements of 48 African ungulates using a set of functional traits related to water losses. Their results suggest each single trait is a valuable indicator of ungulate water requirements.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    In the July issue of the ESA Bulletin, Lockwood et al. present a new use of the arts to communicate science to the public: ecological opera!

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Join the nation’s largest organization of professional ecologists

Learn more about ESA and the benefits of membership, free section or chapter membership, access to our networking directory of professional ecologists and options for professional certification.
ESA is the nation's largest organization of professional ecologists. ESA membership is the best opportunity to network with scientists in all aspects of ecology. Membership is on a sliding scale based on income and country to help promote inclusion.