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New Members Elected to Governing Board

ESA is proud to announce the election results for its Governing Board members. Thank you to the members for participating in the 2019 election, and welcome new members of the Governing Board!

Learn About The Winners

Grad Students Go to Washington

Grad Students Go to Washington

Are you a science graduate student interested in the intersection between policy and science? Applications are now open for the ESA 2020 Graduate Student Policy Award!

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Get Your Proposals in for #ESA2020

Get Your Proposals in for #ESA2020

What kinds of content can you bring to the world's largest meeting of professional ecologists? Proposals are due November 21!

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Renew Your Membership for 2020

Renew Your Membership for 2020

ESA members, it's that time of year again! Ensure that your benefits don't miss a beat and get your renewal for 2020 locked in now.

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Journals & Publications

  • Ecology

    Ecology

    Spartina cordgrass is an iconic group of species that not only shape coastal ecosystems worldwide but also influence many disciplines of ecology. The recent proposal to change the name of this critically emblematic group of plants is the subject of debate, as discussed by Bortolus et al. in the November issue of Ecology.

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  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    In the November issue of Frontiers, Iacarella et al. show how marine conservation plans often fail to include measures to counteract threats posed by non-native taxa, even though species invasions are recognized as a problem in marine protected areas (MPAs). For example, despite the presence of non-native species such as peacock groupers (Cephalopholis argus) around the Hawaiian Islands, efforts to prevent the spread of such species into MPAs are rare.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    Many species of shorebirds migrate long distances to raise their young on a seasonal burst of prey invertebrates in tundra habitats during a short Arctic summer. Long-term changes in the timing of snowmelt and the interaction between temperature and snow phenology have led to greater phenological mismatch between the two trophic levels, as reported by Kwon et al. in the November issue of Ecological Monographs.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    Hettinger et al. introduce a new series in the ESA Bulletin, Human Dimensions. Future works in this series will highlight different ESA sections and chapters and the work they are doing to more tightly couple ecology to human systems, and to further goals of equity, inclusion, and diversity in the study of ecology. –Designing Instruction and Assessing Student Learning

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  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    In the October issue of Ecological Applications, Graham et al. demonstrate that responses to land-use change differ among plants, small mammals, and large mammals in east Africa. Large mammals like the giraffe depend on conserved areas, while many small mammal and plant taxa exhibit affinities for pastoral and agricultural areas. This implies that mosaics of varying land-use are important for conserving diverse assemblages of organisms.

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    In the October issue of Ecosphere, Hejda et al. found that cheatgrass becomes dominant in communities of native perennial bunchgrasses due to its ability to accumulate dead biomass, change the fire regime, and suppress the reproduction of native species. The invasion of cheatgrass in the western United States is an example of a large-scale invasion with massive impacts on native plant diversity.

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Join the nation’s largest organization of professional ecologists

Learn more about ESA and the benefits of membership, free section or chapter membership, access to our networking directory of professional ecologists and options for professional certification.
ESA is the nation's largest organization of professional ecologists. ESA membership is the best opportunity to network with scientists in all aspects of ecology. Membership is on a sliding scale based on income and country to help promote inclusion.

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