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2021 ESA Award Winners

Join us in celebrating this year's honorees for their work as ecologists and leaders in the field.

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Latebreaking Abstracts

Latebreaking Abstracts

We want your science! Latebreaking poster abstract submissions are now open through April 29, with a new presentation option. There's no abstract fee, and you may qualify for a registration grant!

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Registration Support

Registration Support

If you're presenting science at the meeting or lack financial resources to attend, we have ample opportunity for registration and dependent care grants. Explore your options and apply by April 30!

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Virtual Field Trips

Virtual Field Trips

We may be all-virtual for #ESA2021, but we're still having field trips! Learn about how you can share your field station, community project or even innovative classroom, and submit by April 22!

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Journals & Publications

  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Farmers’ choice of livestock species is a key management decision that affects grassland vegetation structure and associated biodiversity values. Agricultural lands may be better managed for both biodiversity and ecosystem services when analyzed as a “farming system”, or a collection of similarly managed farms – such as those that work with domestic sheep in Portugal. In the April issue of Frontiers, Santos et al. describe how the adoption of such a holistic approach may facilitate conducting applied ecological research and comparing the environmental impacts of various agricultural policies.

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  • Ecology

    Ecology

    In the April issue of Ecology, McCain et al. document how montane mammals are shifting to higher elevations in the Rocky Mountains with warming temperatures. Pictured is a Golden‐mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) from Rocky Mountain National Park, which is one of many species that has moved to higher elevations in the Front Range and San Juan Mountains of Colorado, USA with anthropogenic climate change.

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    Structurally complex forest ecosystems are generally more biodiverse, but most means of characterizing complexity rely on overly simplistic one‐ or two‐dimensional measurements. In the March issue of Ecosphere, in a study within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA, Walter et al. developed a new three‐dimensional metric using terrestrial laser scanning of forest complexity to show positive correlations between forest structure and biodiversity, specifically highlighting relationships with stand height and structural variability. This link between ecosystem complexity and biodiversity can be leveraged in the future for regional, or even global, assessments of biodiversity.

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  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    Red Kites (Milvus milvus) can live up to 30 years and are in steep decline in large parts of Europe. In the April issue of Ecological Applications, Sergio et al. show that the decline of the Red Kite population in Doñana National Park in southwestern Spain is driven by the high mortality of younger individuals in their initial pre‐breeding years. Curtailing casualties in this stage of life will be challenging because younger kites range nationwide over very vast areas.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    In their paper in the February issue of Ecological Monographs, Korman et al. quantified the influence of prey abundance, turbidity, and competition on somotic growth rates, and the resulting effects on vital rates and spatial and temporal patterns in abundance.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    Not all field stations are remote! Temple University's new Ambler Field Station supports ongoing studies of forest recovery, stormwater management, and invasive species control, as well as hosting educational and citizen science programming, all less than an hour from Philadelphia. Read more in the April issue of the Bulletin.

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Careers in Ecology (Open Positions)

Join the nation’s largest organization of professional ecologists

Learn more about ESA and the benefits of membership, free section or chapter membership, access to our networking directory of professional ecologists and options for professional certification.
ESA is the nation's largest organization of professional ecologists. ESA membership is the best opportunity to network with scientists in all aspects of ecology. Membership is on a sliding scale based on income and country to help promote inclusion.