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ESA Certification Applications Are Now Open

Biologists, consultants, resource managers, educators and more -- now is the time to apply for ESA certification as an ecologist for 2020! Applications are due Jan. 31, 2020.

Learn more and apply today!

Science Communication Workshop

Science Communication Workshop

This workshop will build participants' confidence and skill set for public engagement, and provides a professional development opportunity to boot.

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2020 Membership Is Open

2020 Membership Is Open

ESA members, it's that time of year again! Ensure that your benefits don't miss a beat and get your renewal for 2020 locked in now.

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Grad Students Go to Washington

Grad Students Go to Washington

Are you a science graduate student interested in the intersection between policy and science? Applications are now open for the ESA 2020 Graduate Student Policy Award!

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Journals & Publications

  • Ecology

    Ecology

    Sneaking mating tactic has fascinated scientists for decades, and mechanisms behind its evolution remain unclear. In the December issue of Ecology, Rassim Khelifa examines sexual conflict in the rare endemic riverine damselfly, Calopteryx exul. Khelifa shows females contribute in the success of sneaker males by actively avoiding dominant males and thus securing the sneaker’s paternity.

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  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    In the December issue of Frontiers, Buxton et al. map the presence and sources of anthropogenic noise across US national parks. By analyzing thousands of hours of acoustic recordings, they were able to determine where noise sources such as vehicles, park visitors, trains, and aircraft could pose the greatest threats to wildlife behavior, physiology, and fitness.

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  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    In the December issue of Ecological Applications, Bejarano et al. show biomass of herbivorous coral reef fish increased steeply following the cessation of muroami fishing in an Indonesian marine park. Although assemblages remained functionally stable, rabbitfishes, like this pair of Siganus puellus with distinctively pronounced snouts capable of reaching cryptic algae, were one of the families that became particularly abundant. This increase contributes to the diversity mechanisms of turf algae removal throughout the park.

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    In the November issue of Ecosphere, Nandintsetseg et al. utilized GPS movement data from 40 individuals of four ungulate species in the Gobi‐Steppe Ecosystem, calculating displacement distances and recursion metrics and performing a PCA, to quantify the variation in movement patterns. They found that ungulates in the resource‐rich steppe tended to move long distances with few revisits, while ungulates in the resource‐poor desert tended to move shorter distances with more revisits, suggesting that xeric and mesic habitats promote different types of nomadic strategies.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    Many species of shorebirds migrate long distances to raise their young on a seasonal burst of prey invertebrates in tundra habitats during a short Arctic summer. Long-term changes in the timing of snowmelt and the interaction between temperature and snow phenology have led to greater phenological mismatch between the two trophic levels, as reported by Kwon et al. in the November issue of Ecological Monographs.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    Hettinger et al. introduce a new series in the ESA Bulletin, Human Dimensions. Future works in this series will highlight different ESA sections and chapters and the work they are doing to more tightly couple ecology to human systems, and to further goals of equity, inclusion, and diversity in the study of ecology. –Designing Instruction and Assessing Student Learning

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