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Early-bird Registration Is Now Open

Get ready for the world's largest gathering of ecologists, Aug. 2-6. The best rates are available through June 24!

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Registration Support

Registration Support

If you're presenting science at the meeting or lack financial resources to attend, we have ample opportunity for registration and dependent care grants.

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Happy Birthday, SEEDS!

Happy Birthday, SEEDS!

Our flagship undergraduate diversity program turns 25 this year, and we're looking ahead for much more great work to come. Can you donate $25 to support SEEDS today?

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TEK Webinar Series

TEK Webinar Series

First in a series from the TEK Section! Join Dr. Daniel R. Wildcat from Haskell Indian Nations University, author of Red Alert: Saving the Planet with Indigenous Knowledge.

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Journals & Publications

  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    In New Zealand and other island systems, native biota may be at greater risk to the indirect – as opposed to direct – impacts of climate change. Such is likely the case with adult populations of the endemic yellow‐eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes), whose survival depends on a marine food web that is increasingly subjected to rising sea-surface temperatures. In the May issue of Frontiers, Macinnis-Ng et al. explain that to help protect islands as biodiversity hotspots, scientists will need to fill existing knowledge gaps on the indirect drivers and processes of climate change when refining conservation and mitigation efforts.

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  • Ecology

    Ecology

    In their study published in the May issue of Ecology, Davies et al. investigated how African wild dogs, which are competitively inferior to lions and frequently killed by them, coexist with lions in a landscape where both carnivores are present at exceptionally high densities. They found wild dogs are able to exploit the heterogeneous landscape of the study region to avoid detection by lions, providing evidence for spatial heterogeneity being a mechanism for carnivore coexistence.

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    Two ecosystem engineering beachgrass species dominate the coastal sand dunes of the United States Pacific Northwest. European beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria) and American beachgrass (Ammophila breviligulata) were intentionally introduced to stabilize a naturally shifting sand environment and have had differential effects on coastal protection and biodiversity conservation. A novel hybrid between these two species is described by Mostow et al. in the April issue of Ecosphere on the basis of morphological, cytological, and genetic analyses. The Ammophila hybrid has been found at 12 coastal sites in Washington and Oregon, including the dune pictured here in Pacific City, Oregon. Understanding the ecological and population genetic consequences of this novel hybridization event is of the utmost importance in a system in which any change in dominant beachgrass species can have large effects on both biodiversity management and coastal protection.

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  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    Red Kites (Milvus milvus) can live up to 30 years and are in steep decline in large parts of Europe. In the April issue of Ecological Applications, Sergio et al. show that the decline of the Red Kite population in Doñana National Park in southwestern Spain is driven by the high mortality of younger individuals in their initial pre‐breeding years. Curtailing casualties in this stage of life will be challenging because younger kites range nationwide over very vast areas.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    With ongoing global change, landscape structure changes are expected to be a driver of extinction rates of temperate zone ectotherms. In a study by Rozen-Rechels et al. in the May issue of Ecological Monographs, the authors conclude that changes in water availability, coupled with rising temperatures, might have a drastic impact on the population dynamics of some ectotherm species.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    Not all field stations are remote! Temple University's new Ambler Field Station supports ongoing studies of forest recovery, stormwater management, and invasive species control, as well as hosting educational and citizen science programming, all less than an hour from Philadelphia. Read more in the April issue of the Bulletin.

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Careers in Ecology (Open Positions)

Join the nation’s largest organization of professional ecologists

Learn more about ESA and the benefits of membership, free section or chapter membership, access to our networking directory of professional ecologists and options for professional certification.
ESA is the nation's largest organization of professional ecologists. ESA membership is the best opportunity to network with scientists in all aspects of ecology. Membership is on a sliding scale based on income and country to help promote inclusion.