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Submit Your #ESA2020 Abstract Today!

Present your work and network with colleagues at the world's largest meeting of professional ecologists. The deadline to submit an abstract for a talk or poster is Feb. 20 at 5:00 PM ET.

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Join ESA for 2020

Join ESA for 2020

There's no better time to join! Start or renew today to get the most out of your 2020 benefits and opportunities to save!

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Upcoming Webinars

Upcoming Webinars

ESA is proud to present these sessions on key concepts in the science and practice of ecology. This month includes nonprofit science careers and working with NEON data!

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Social Events in Salt Lake City

Social Events in Salt Lake City

Hosting a meeting, mixer, or other event for #ESA2020? Submit your event request by Thurs., March 12 at 5:00 PM ET.

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Journals & Publications

  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Molecular detection techniques can be used in species monitoring, pathogen surveillance, dietary analysis, and a variety of other ecological applications. In the February issue of Frontiers, Mosher et al. present a communication framework that can help to guide collaborative partnerships between laboratory scientists, resource managers, and ecologists who use these methods.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    Bumble bees can forage in adverse weather conditions, comprising an important group of pollinators in temperate zones. This social bee forages for pollen and/or nectar from a large variety of flowers in order to cover its nutritional needs. However, floral nectar is strongly populated by microbes such as yeasts, and these microbes might change nectar quality, affecting pollinator reward and impacting foraging decisions and the fitness of the insect consumer, as reported by Pozo et al. in the February issue.

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  • Ecology

    Ecology

    Prescribed fire, such as the one photographed here in a woody-encroached tallgrass prairie at Konza Prairie Biological Station, Manhattan, Kansas, USA in August 2018, are used to restore health to ecosystems. In the February issue of Ecology, O’Connor et al. show synergistic interactions among simulated browsing and prescribed fire to reduce the cover and dominance of a clonal resprouting shrub while facilitating the recovery of native grasses.

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    Following the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, which caused the deposition of tens of meters of pumice, tephra, and ash, new watersheds have begun to form with populations of Sitka willow, an early riparian colonist. In the January issue of Ecosphere, LeRoy et al. show that in these new populations, female willows are colonizing closer to the stream edges than males, influencing the organic matter inputs and litter processing rates, thereby altering in-stream early successional communities.

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  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    As opportunistic omnivores, wild pigs (Sus scrofa) cause extensive damage to native ecosystems and agricultural resources. In the January 2020 issue of Ecological Applications, Wilber et al. use GPS data collected from 326 wild pigs across seven U.S. states to demonstrate that wild pigs exhibit a functional response in their use of crops that is highly context dependent, and that the magnitude of response varies among crop types and pig demographic attributes.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    In the latest entry to the ESA Bulletin Paper Trail, Pandit and Han discuss machine learning and its applications in disease ecology.

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Learn more about ESA and the benefits of membership, free section or chapter membership, access to our networking directory of professional ecologists and options for professional certification.
ESA is the nation's largest organization of professional ecologists. ESA membership is the best opportunity to network with scientists in all aspects of ecology. Membership is on a sliding scale based on income and country to help promote inclusion.