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Just Two Days Left Till the Early-bird Deadline

The early-bird registration deadline for the 2019 ESA+USSEE Annual Meeting is this Thursday, June 27. Don't miss your chance to save on dynamic research, networking, career development and so much more!

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Service Opportunities in Louisville

Service Opportunities in Louisville

The ESA+USSEE Annual Meeting isn't just a place to learn and network -- it's also a great place to pass on your skills and experience to others, and to contribute to the success and growth of others in ecology. Check out these opportunities, including student volunteering for reimbursed registration, to serve in Louisville!

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Career Development at the Annual Meeting

Career Development at the Annual Meeting

In September 2019, ESA members will elect leaders for offices on the Governing Board and Board of Professional Certification who will take office in 2020. See who's running!

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Sustaining Biological Infrastructure: New Training Opportunities

Sustaining Biological Infrastructure: New Training Opportunities

  • October 15-17: Join us for 3 days to hone your skills in fundraising, communications, and strategic planning.
    Registration deadline: August 30
  • December 10-11: NEW course: Creating a Successful Business Plan. We’ll provide the tools and information you need to construct a business plan for your project or program.

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News

Journals & Publications

  • Ecological Applications

    Ecological Applications

    Animal hair traps are efficient means to collect specimens and provide an information dense data source that can be used to genetically identify species, individuals, sex, and to infer relatedness. In the June issue of Ecological Applications, Lamb et al. review the global application of genetic tags to investigate drivers of population density, trajectory, connectivity and human-wildlife interaction across massive spatial extents.

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  • Ecological Monographs

    Ecological Monographs

    The relationship between animals and their gut flora is simultaneously one of the most common and most complex symbioses on Earth. In the May 2019 issue of Ecological Monographs, Ravenscraft et al. characterize variation of the gut microbiota within and among butterfly species, increasing our understanding of how this hidden symbiosis affects and is affected by its host.

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  • Bulletin

    Bulletin

    There are many ways to approach science communication. In the April issue of the ESA Bulletin, Bayer and Hettinger explore storytelling as a way to build bridges between scientists and community members.

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  • Ecosphere

    Ecosphere

    Given the current scenario of rapid environmental change driven by anthropogenic activity, there is growing interest in understanding the role of global change in the emergence and spread of infectious diseases. In the May issue of Ecosphere, Bacigalupe et al. use a correlative species distribution model to estimate the environmental suitability for Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis of the Chilean Winter Rainfall–Valdivian Forest biodiversity hotspot.

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  • Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Wildfires can be destructive but they also promote diverse populations of flowering plants, including the California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), which in turn support a variety of pollinators, such as the European honeybee (Apis mellifera). In the June issue of Frontiers, Pausas and Keeley describe the abundance of ecosystem services that natural fire regimes provide, and discuss the advantages of living in a flammable world.

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  • Ecology

    Ecology

    Giant tortoises perform annual migrations between seasonal ranges to take advantage of the changing environmental conditions. In the June issue of Ecology, Bastille-Rousseau et al. found weak adjustments in their migration timing in response to climate variation. This could represent a troubling perspective regarding the ability of giant tortoises to adjust their migration to projected changes in environmental conditions due to climate change.

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Join the nation’s largest organization of professional ecologists

Learn more about ESA and the benefits of membership, free section or chapter membership, access to our networking directory of professional ecologists and options for professional certification.
ESA is the nation's largest organization of professional ecologists. ESA membership is the best opportunity to network with scientists in all aspects of ecology. Membership is on a sliding scale based on income and country to help promote inclusion.