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Press Releases

Larger streams are critical for wild brook trout conservation

By Penn State University 6/3/2020 The Latin name for brook trout — Salvelinus fontinalis — means “speckled fish of the fountains,” but a new study by Penn State researchers suggests, for the first time, that the larger streams and rivers those fountains, or headwaters, flow into may be just as important to the brook trout. With few exceptions, brook trout…

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NAU professor a collaborator on research, published in a special-edition journal, addressing need for conservation of springs in drying climate

By Northern Arizona University 6/2/2020 A Northern Arizona University professor co-authored a paper on the importance of springs in a drying climate that is in the inaugural climate change refugia special edition of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. The issue focuses on refugia, which refers to areas that are relatively buffered from current climate change and shelter valued wildlife,…

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Loss of animals in tropical forests threatens the trees

By MNHN – CNRS 6/2/2020 A team of researchers from the ‘Adaptation and Evolution‘ unit of the French National Museum of Natural History (MNHN – CNRS) has published the results of a novel study in French Guiana on the effects that hunting can have on forest regeneration. They found that when large animals that naturally disperse the seeds of some…

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Oil Platforms’ Fishy Future

By University of Santa Barbara 6/2/2020 Biologists and fishermen alike know that offshore oil platforms function as de facto habitats for fish. The structures climb hundreds of feet into the water column, creating a prefab reef out in open water. But many of these platforms will soon be decommissioned, and government agencies are considering the potential ecological effects in deciding…

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Conserving Biodiverse ‘Slow Lanes’ in a Rapidly Changing World

By University of Massachusetts Amherst 6/1/2020 The notion of conserving climate change refugia – areas relatively buffered from current climate change that shelter valued wildlife, ecosystems, and other natural resources – is only about 10 years old, but the field has matured enough that a leading journal has prepared a special issue on the topic. It offers “a look back…

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Scientists pinpoint areas in boreal forests that offer refuge to plants and animals as climate gets warmer and drier

By University of Alberta 6/1/2020 North America’s boreal forests are warming and drying from climate change, but they still hold places that can offer refuge for plants and animals, according to University of Alberta scientists who have taken the lead in creating a guide to identify those areas. The information about these sheltered places known as climate-change refugia—including large lakes,…

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Changing Freshwater Flows Affect Fish Populations in the Potomac River

By USGS 4/3/2020 Millions of people rely on the Potomac River for drinking water and recreational opportunities. The Potomac is Maryland’s most popular freshwater fishing destination, and the second largest river that enters the Chesapeake Bay. Restoring fisheries is also an important goal for the Chesapeake Bay Partnership restoration efforts. The USGS worked with Maryland Department of Natural Resources (MD DNR)…

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Charismatic invasive species have an easier time settling into new habitats

By University of Córdoba 4/21/2020 An international study, in which the University of Cordoba participated, assessed the influence of charisma in the handling of invasive species and concluded that the perception people have of them can hinder our control over these species and condition their spread Charisma can launch professional success and improve leadership skills. It can make a difference…

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Oyster Farming and Shorebirds Likely Can Coexist

by Rutgers University 5/14/20 Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings, published in the journal Ecosphere, likely apply to other areas around the country including the West Coast and Gulf Coast, where oyster aquaculture…

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