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External Press Releases

Large ‘herbivores of the sea’ help keep coral reefs healthy

By Pennsylvania State University 1/8/2020 Selective fishing can disrupt the delicate balance maintained between corals and algae in embattled Caribbean coral reefs. Removing large parrotfish, which graze on algae like large land mammals graze on grasses, can allow the algae to overtake the corals, with potentially dire consequences for reef health. New experimental research suggests that maintaining a healthy size…

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Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima

By University of Georgia 1/6/2020 Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life. The camera study, published in the Journal of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, reports that over 267,000 wildlife photos recorded more than 20 species, including wild…

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Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought

By Lancaster University 12/20/2019 The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows. The findings could have significant impacts for climate change predictions as the ability of secondary forests to soak up carbon from the atmosphere may have been over-estimated. The study, which monitored forest regrowth over two decades, shows that…

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Researchers find some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity

By Oregon State University 12/9/2019 CORVALLIS, Ore. – A study by Oregon State University researchers has identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity. Those forests are mainly along the Pacific coast and in the Cascade Range, with pockets of them…

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Mangroves on the run find a more northern home

By Chrystian Trejedor, Florida International University 12/18/2019 The north might no longer be as inhospitable to mangroves as it once was. Fleeing rising seas in South Florida, mangroves are establishing themselves farther north along Florida’s Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Some are thriving in southern Texas and are already approaching Mississippi and Alabama – places where they historically could not withstand the climate,…

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Researchers find some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity

By Steve Lundeberg, Oregon State University 12/9/2019 CORVALLIS, Ore. – A study by Oregon State University researchers has identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity. Those forests are mainly along the Pacific coast and in the Cascade Range, with pockets…

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Study sheds light on UK’s ‘overlooked’ bee species

By Anglia Ruskin University 12/11/2019 CAMBRIDGE, U.K.–Findings from ARU project could help to protect solitary, ground-nesting bees The UK’s first citizen science project focusing on solitary, ground-nesting bees has revealed that they nest in a far broader range of habitats than previously thought. There are approximately 250 species of solitary bee in the UK, but far less is known about…

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A (sorta) good news story about a songbird and climate change

By University of Manitoba 12/12/2019 MANITOBA, Canada –  University of Manitoba researchers made a recent discovery that suggests Purple Martins, unlike other long-distance migratory songbirds, show promise of being able to adapt to climate change. The Purple Martin’s (Progne subis) breeding range spans from Florida to northern Alberta, and the smartphone-sized songbird passes our winter months on small islands in…

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Living at the edges

By Washington State University 12/4/2019 PULLMAN, Wash. – Resembling an overgrown house cat with black-tipped ears and a stubby tail, the Canada lynx, a native of North America, teeters on the brink of extinction in the U.S. The few lynx that now roam parts of Washington and the mountainous Northwest survive largely because of a network of protected landscapes that crosses…

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Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies

By KU Leuven 11/20/2019 Researchers from KU Leuven have discovered that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. The study discovered that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness. “Research into the role of microbes in our ecosystem is of vital importance to safeguard bees.”…

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