Ecology and COVID-19 #5: Coronavirus, Human Hubris, and Life in the Coevolving Biosphere
Aug25

Ecology and COVID-19 #5: Coronavirus, Human Hubris, and Life in the Coevolving Biosphere

This blogpost originally appeared on the website for Bruce Byers Consulting. by Bruce Byers The novel coronavirus is holding up a mirror for our species, giving us an opportunity to consider our place in the evolution of life on Earth and question our anthropocentrism. What I’ve missed during this pandemic and shutdown of our usual social and economic life is writing or reporting that puts this experience, unprecedented in our...

Read More
Ecology and COVID #4: Leveraging the liabilities of virtual collaboration
Jun03

Ecology and COVID #4: Leveraging the liabilities of virtual collaboration

by Benjamin S. Halpern1,2, Julien Brun1, Amber Budden1, Marty Downs1, Carrie V. Kappel1, and Julia S. Stewart Lowndes1 1National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 2Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA When the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) started shutting down its research labs on March 12 in response to...

Read More
Ecology and COVID #3: Can Technology Fill the Coronavirus Data Gap?
May22

Ecology and COVID #3: Can Technology Fill the Coronavirus Data Gap?

by National Ecological Observatory Network When humans can’t get to the field for ecological research, could the robots take over? When humans can’t get to the field for ecological research, could the robots take over? COVID-19 has limited the ability of ecologists to get to the field to collect samples and check instruments in many parts of the world. While travel and work restrictions may be lifted in some areas over the summer, the...

Read More
Ecology and COVID #2: Evolutionary Biology and Questions Regarding the Coronavirus
May11

Ecology and COVID #2: Evolutionary Biology and Questions Regarding the Coronavirus

by Jorge V. Crisci (Universidad Nacional de la La Plata, Argentina) and Tod F. Stuessy (Ohio State University, USA) The great German physicist Werner Heisenberg remarked that nature does not reveal itself directly but only through questions we ask about it. This is true for questions we have with the tragic pandemic of COVID-19. In the last 17 years, coronaviruses, minute parasites of animals, have been transmitted to humans on three...

Read More
Ecology and COVID-19 #1: To go or not to go (in the field)?
Apr14

Ecology and COVID-19 #1: To go or not to go (in the field)?

By Martha Downs, Frank Davis, Jenn Caselle, Julien Brun, and Kristen Weiss Like marine fog that blankets one community while leaving a nearby neighborhood in sunshine, COVID 19 crept up on us at an uneven pace. In California, awareness and action to halt its spread came quickly, with in-person instruction at UC Santa Barbara, where the LTER Network Office is located, halted on March 11 and virtually all research operations halted on...

Read More