Deevey Award Winners

Edward S. Deevey, a founder of modern paleoecology, was a dedicated student advisor who mentored many investigators active in the field of paleoecology today. To honor his memory and to encourage high quality research by graduate students, the Paleoecology Section presents an award for the best presentation by a student in paleoecology at the ESA Annual Meeting.


2013

John Calder, 2013 Deevey Award Winner

2013 Deevey Award winner William John Calder, a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wyoming.

This year’s Deevey Award winner was William John Calder, a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wyoming, for his presentation: “The influence of spatial scale on detecting climatic controls of wildfire in subalpine forests for the last 2000 years in northern Colorado.” His presentation was co-authored by Dusty Parker, Cody Stopka, and Bryan Shuman. Mr. Calder completed a Masters of Science degree in Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation from Brigham Young University in 2009. His research focuses on the climatic controls on wildfire in subalpine forests and how fire and climate change interact to shape the vegetation on a landscape. The Paleoecology Section thanks students who competed for this year’s Deevey Award, and we encourage them and others to participate in the 2014 competition.

Contributed by Kendra McLauchlan, 2013 Deevey Award coordinator:


 

2012

Ryan Kelly, a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois and winner of the 2013 Deevey Award.
Ryan Kelly, a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois and winner of the 2013 Deevey Award.

 Ryan Kelly, PhD candidate in the Department of Plant Biology at the University of Illinois,

is the winner of the 2012 Deevey Award for his presentation titled “Pushing the limits of the boreal-forest fire regimes: recent changes in a 10,000 year context.” His presentation was co-authored by Melissa Chipman, Philip E. Higuera, Linda B. Brubaker, and Feng Sheng Hu. Ryan’s research reconstructed 10,000 years of boreal forest fire history from analysis of macroscopic charcoal accumulation in sediment cores from Alaska. He presented evidence that the boreal fire regime has been changing through fuel depletion. Mr. Kelly completed a BS in Integrative Biology from the University of Illinois in 2005.


2011

Alex W. Ireland, a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Lehigh University, is the winner of the 2011 Deevey Award for his presentation: “Hydroclimatic variability and basin morphology control terrestrialization in glacial kettles.” His presentation was co-authored by Robert Booth. His research investigated the sensitivity of kettlehole ecosystems in northern Wisconsin to abrupt drought-induced transformation, and he presented evidence contrary to prevailing paradigms of terrestrialization. Mr. Ireland completed a Bachelor of Science from Clarion University in 2007. The Paleoecology Section thanks students who competed for this year’s Deevey Award.

Contributed by Kendra McLauchlan, 2013 Deevey Award coordinator:


2010

Shelley Crausbay, a Ph.D. candidate in the Botany Department at the University of Wisconsin, is the 2010 Deevey Award winner, for her talk titled “Species assemblage and fire dynamics over the past 3000 years in an upper montane cloud forest in Hawai’i,” coauthored with Sarah Hotchkiss.


2009


2008

Larisa DeSantis, a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Zoology at the University of Florida in Gainesville, is the winner of the 2008 Deevey award for her talk: “Effects of global warming on ancient mammalian communities and their environments.” Her presentation was co-authored by Robert S. Ferenec and Bruce J. MacFadden. Ms. DeSantis used stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in mammal fossils in two well-dated Florida sites to reconstruct niche shifts between glacial and interglacial environments. The stable isotope evidence showed that interglacial warming resulted in dramatic vegetation and dietary changes. The stable isotope analysis suggests an expansion of C4 grasses during interglacial periods and an increase in mammalian use of these grasses. Ms. DeSantis is completing her doctoral research at the Florida Museum of Natural History which was Edward S. Deevey’s home institution at the time of his death. Ms. DeSantis received her B.S. in Resource Management from the University of California, Berkeley and her M.E.M in Conservation Biology from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. She has strong interests in science outreach to K-12 teachers and is developing teaching materials for use in schools. Many thanks to all the students who competed for this year’s Deevey Award, and to the judges as well.


2007

Leila M. Zajac, a Ph.D.candidate in the Department of Geography at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is the winner of the 2007 Deevey award for her talk “Modeling late-glacial no-analog climates with expanded response surfaces.”  Her presentation was co-authored by Jack W. Williams, and Rick Nordheim.  Ms. Zajac’s Ph.D. research focuses on modeling the late glacial climate and vegetation at Crystal Lake in north-eastern Illinois, a period where the climatic conditions and plant communities don’t co-exist today.  In order to model these “non-analog” late-glacial climatic conditions, she developed a new innovative statistical modeling approach called expanded response surfaces.  This approach allows her to infer pollen-climate relationships for climatic conditions that are outside of the modern climate domain.  The committee was particularly impressed with the innovative approach employed to reconstruct non-analog climatic conditions.  She completed a M.S. in Geophysical Science from the University of Chicago in 2004 and a B.S. and B.A. in Mathematics and Spanish in 1995 from Regis University.  The Paleoecology Section thanks students who competed for this year’s Deevey Award and we encourage others to participate in the 2008 competition, to be held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  The Section appreciates the efforts of the 2007 Deevey Award Selection

Contributed by Jason Lynch, 2007 Deevey Award coordinator.

Committee:  Jason Lynch (chair), Philip Higuera, Sarah Finkelstein, and Richard Brugam.


2006

MichaelTweiten_DeeveyWinner2006

2006 Deevey Award winner, Michael Tweiten, PhD candidate in the Department of Botany at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Michael Tweiten, PhD candidate in the Department of Botany at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, won the 2006 Deevey Award for his presentation titled “Reconstructing historical patterns of jack pine budworm outbreaks in forest hollows from Wisconsin.” Coauthor Sara Hotchkiss assisted him with his research. His award winning presentation explored the interaction between jack pine trees, population outbreaks of caterpillars that feed on them, and wild fire frequency during different periods of climatic change. The committee was particularly impressed with the quality and clarity of his presentation and the novel methods he developed for estimating insect outbreak intensities and vegetation changes across pre- and post-settlement times. Mr. Tweiten completed his Bachelor of Science in Botany from the University of Washington. Before entering graduate school at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, he examined successional changes following the Mt. St. Helens eruption and responses of plant community to prescribed burning in Northern Arizona. The Paleoecology Section thanks students who competed for this year’s Deevey Award and encourages others to participate in the 2007 competition, to be held at the Annual Meeting in San Jose, CA on August 5-10. The Section also appreciates the efforts of the 2006 Deevey Award Selection

Committee: Jason Lynch (Chair), Bob Booth, Richard Brugam, Steve Jackson and Mark Bush.


 2005

Zoe Finkel, recent PhD from Rutgers University and at the Mount Allison University in New Brunswick in 2005. Her presentation was entitled “Climatically driven macroevolutionary change in the size of marine planktonic diatoms.” Her research considered multiple hypotheses and demonstrated long-term evolutionary change in diatom size with potential links to global carbon and nutrient cycles.

Committee: Jason Lynch (Chair), Jason McLachlan, Bob Booth, Dan Gavin, and Jack Williams.


 2004

Jason McLachlan, recent PhD from the Biology Department of Duke University. His presentation was entitles “The importance of small populations in the post glacial dynamics of eastern forests,” and was coauthored by James S. Clark and Paul S. Manos. Jason and his coauthors used patterns of genetic variation in modern tree populations and fossil pollen data to reconstruct temporal and spatial patterns of postglacial migration in eastern North America.

Committee: Jason Lynch (Chair), Lisa Carlson, Allen Solomon, Bob Booth, Don Falk, and Bryan Shuman.


2003

Don Falk of the Laboratory of Tree Ring Research and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Arizona was awarded the 2003 Edward S. Deevey Award for an Outstanding Student Presentation in Paleoecology. His presentation was entitled “The event–area relationship: scale dependence in the fire regime of a New Mexico ponderosa pine forest.” Don used a novel statistical approach to describe how parameters that describe the forest fire regime are scale dependent.

Deevey Award Selection Committee: Jason Lynch (Chair), Dan Gavin, Andrea Lloyd, and Phil Townsend.


 2002

Lynn Anderson, PhD student at the University of Illinois, for her talk “A molecular-genetic approach to understanding the migration history of Picea (spruce) in North America,” which she co-authored with F. S. Hu and K. N. Paige.


 2001

Robert Booth, University of Wyoming, was awarded the 2001 Deevey Award for his talk titled “A high-resolution record of late Holocene surface-moisture changes from a Michigan raised bog.”


2000


1999


1998


1997

Lisa Carlson, PhD student at the University of Washington, for her talk titled “Evidence for spruce migration and full glacial vegetation from Jan Lake, Alaska.”


1996

Sara Hotchkiss, PhD student at the University of Minnesota, for her talk “A 29,000-year record of vegetation and fire history from Kohala Mountain, Hawaii.”