Notice: SC-1, 4 & 5 and WK-1, 2, 5, 9, 11, 16, 18, 19, 22, 24, 26 & 28 are full. Waitlist: registrar@nullesa.org

Collaborations Across ESA Programs to Advance Science, Education and Diversity

Monday, August 2, 2021
12:00 – 1:00 PM PST/3:00 -4:00 PM EST

Moderator: Pamula Templer, Boston University

This year’s Diversity Roundtable (aka Diversity Luncheon) will feature our ESA program leaders who will share their perspectives on “Collaborations across ESA programs to advance science, education and diversity”. In line with the ESA meeting theme of Vital Connections in Ecology, the need for collaboration across disciplinary ideas, communities and spaces have never been more critical. ESA has a vibrant suite of programs including our meetings, publications and a wide range of activities designed by sections and chapters and grant-funded activities such as SEEDS. Our complex and changing world calls for novel approaches in research, engagement and leadership. How can we advance science, education and diversity through a collaborative model starting with our own programs, chapters and sections? How can we ensure that the next generation of ecologists remain supported throughout their careers in all sectors?

 

Career Success in the Private Sector

Monday, August 2, 2021
12:00 – 1:00 PM PST/3:00 -4:00 PM EST

Moderator: Timothy Nuttle, Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc.

Ecologists who work as consultants or scientists in private industry have unique professionals needs and experiences, to say nothing of pathways to success. This discussion will feature ecologists in several different industries whose experiences can provide guidance to anybody thinking of work in the private sector. Come to connect with colleagues, ask questions and share your own experiences!

 

Paradigm shifts: A Discussion on Statistical Models vs Machine Learning vs AI (Statistical Ecology Section)

Tuesday, August 3, 2021
12:00 – 1:00 PM PST/3:00 -4:00 PM EST

Moderators: Denis Valle, University of Florida and Joshua Cullen, University of Florida

Statistical Models Panelist: Krishna Pacifici, NC State and Guillaume Blanchet, Universite de Sherbrooke Machine Learning/AI Panelist: Dan Morris, Microsoft® and Jake Zwart, USGS

In this roundtable, we will invite three speakers to compare and contrast statistical models, machine learning methods, and artificial intelligence (AI) approaches. Each speaker will be an expert on one of these approaches and will provide a 10 min presentation. Then, we will open the forum for discussions. Speakers will be asked to address the following questions in their presentations:

  • How is your approach better/different than the other approaches?
  • In your opinion, what are the main trends regarding the use of your approach? What are the main challenges regarding the use of your approach?
  • What are 3 things that you’d like your approach to be able to do that cannot be done currently?
  • What are the key skills that students and working professionals need to acquire to be able to use your approach?
  • How can students and working professionals prepare themselves to be able to use your approach?

 

Building an Ecology Career and a Family

Tuesday, August 3, 2021
12:00 – 1:00 PM PST/3:00 -4:00 PM EST

Moderator: Cari Ficken, University at Buffalo

Many ecologists, especially early in their careers, face the dual pressures of work and home. Succeeding as a partner, parent or caregiver and as a professional at the same time can feel like a daunting task. Join this conversation with some folks who have or are currently navigating that space themselves, connect with peers, and get and give good advice!

 

Planetary Health: Emerging Opportunity in the Intersections of Human Health and Earth’s Natural Systems

Tuesday, August 3, 2021
3:30 – 4:30 PM PST/6:30-7:30 PM EST

Moderator: Lin Meng, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Panelists: Chiho Watanabe, Nagasaki University, Robert Dyball, Australian National University, Tony Capon, Monash University, and Saleemul Huq, Independent University Bangladesh

Planetary Health refers to the status of human health and society, of biodiversity, and of earth systems, interacting with each other. This panel brings together panelists from diverse perspectives to discuss new opportunities in Planetary Health, including what is Planetary Health; how can we best protect the health of the earth in the face of accelerating climate change, biodiversity loss, air pollution, and other challenges; how we can take action that simultaneously addresses the wellbeing of humans and the environment. Panelists will also talk about activities and challenges related to Planetary Health with an emphasis on but not limited to Asia, Australia, Africa, and Latin American regions.

 

The Non-tenure Track Faculty Experience

Wednesday, August 4, 2021
12:00 – 1:00 PM PST/3:00 -4:00 PM EST

Moderator: Bethann Merkle, University of Wyoming

Are you an instructor or researcher or staff member at an academic institution who’s not on the tenure track? Interested in education but maybe not in everything required for tenure? Get to know professionals who share this experience, talk about the unique pluses and minuses, and pick up some strategies for success.

 

Language Bias as a Barrier in Ecological Sciences: Challenges and Solutions Toward A Truly Inclusive Community

Wednesday, August 4, 2021
3:30 – 4:30 PM PST/6:30-7:30 PM EST

Moderator: Josue Arteaga-Torres, University of Alberta

Panelist: Dr. Tatsuya Amano, The University of Queensland, Dr. Julien Martin, Ottawa University, Dr. Kimberley J. Mathot, University of Alberta, Dr. Martín A. Núñez, CONICET/University of Houston and MSc. Valeria Ramírez Castañeda, PhD candidate, Berkeley University

English has become the implicit official language of science globally. While using a common language has allowed for greater communication across different regions, it has also limited access to information and created additional challenges for non-native speakers. This, in turn, has generated a bias toward research involving information that is only available in English, as well as prevented information not in English from getting disseminated to the broader community. This panel will include native English speakers who have worked in non-English-speaking countries, as well as scientists who are native speakers of languages other than English and have worked or are currently working in English-speaking regions. Some of the panelists are actively pursuing how to build a more inclusive scientific community by highlighting the importance of including research conducted in other languages and the consequences of only including research published in English. In this panel, we will discuss different challenges and possible solutions for this language bias in an effort to promote and highlight ways to make the field of ecology more inclusive.

 

Meet ESA Leaders in Education and Diversity Programs

Thursday, August 5, 2021
12:00 – 1:00 PM PST/3:00 -4:00 PM EST

Moderators: Pamela Templer, Boston University and Carmen Cid, Eastern Connecticut State University

Event Description

Join Pamela Templer (Boston University, outgoing VP of Education and Human Resources) and Carmen Cid (Eastern Connecticut State University, incoming VP of Education and Human Resources) along with members of the Committee on Diversity and Education for an informal chat and networking session. We will talk about existing programs and recent changes, your ideas for priorities in education and diversity and ways to get involved.

 

Climate Science in the Courtroom: Being an Expert Witness

Thursday, August 5, 2021
12:00 – 1:00 PM PST/3:00 -4:00 PM EST

Moderator: Augusta Wilson, Climate Science Legal Defense Fund

Scientists from numerous disciplines can act as expert witnesses in climate-related cases. While this can be an exciting opportunity to participate in the legal process, the prospect of doing so can be intimidating. And there’s a great deal for scientists to know as the need for their participation in climate litigation expands.  This roundtable discussion, led by an attorney from the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund and based on our organization’s ten years of experience working at the intersection of science and the law, will focus on trends related to the use of science in the growing climate litigation arena. We will address how science has affected the decisions and outcomes in specific cases and how that has changed over time. We will also cover what this means for scientists who wish to participate in climate cases, what scientists should expect when acting as an expert witness, and advice for working with attorneys.