Skip to main content

ESA Staff is at the Annual Meeting in Montreal. Meeting Website

Education Share Fair Roundtable

COVID-19 policy for LDC attendees

Vaccinations are required for all attendees. Please review the Covid-19 Policy for more details. Please contact ldc@nullesa.org if you have any questions or concerns.

Information for LDC Presenters

What is the Education Share Fair Roundtable?

The Education Share Fair will be a central event of the Life Discovery – Doing Science Education conference!

We know there is a lot of wisdom among our participants!!  The Education Share Fair is designed for educators to share teaching ideas and resources at any stage of development to receive peer feedback.

Participants will have the opportunity to provide peer feedback on fresh, preliminary ideas or discover extensions on successful, developed ones. Presentations may highlight ideas for lessons and curriculum design, modern technologies, and new applications of traditional techniques; creative tools, or classroom space design! Discussions can cover issues related to but not restricted to core concepts, teaching methodology, misconceptions, assessments, or educational extensions.

Each presentation will be at a roundtable with up to 3-5 other participants. All presenters are strongly encouraged to incorporate feedback and publish teaching ideas and classroom-ready scientific resources such as photo collections, figures and charts, case studies, simulations, and datasets, etc. in the LifeDiscoveryEd Digital Library as a record of conference proceedings. Submissions will be peer-reviewed.

At the time of arrival at the conference, you will select to join a presentation from Round A and Round B. Each table is limited to 5 persons (including the presenter).

Roundtable Discussion Descriptions

Friday, October 1, 2021, 12:45 PM

Room: Emerald Mountain

Table: 1

Curing Plant Blindness: Exploring the effects of an online intervention in a large enrollment majors Biology class

Presenter: Samiksha Raut, The University of Alabama at Birmingham

Pedagogical Focus: Collaboration

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: The vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education, has emphasized Biological literacy (AAAS 2009). While national attempts have been actively focused on increasing biological literacy, much work needs to be done as regards botanical literacy, especially for non-majors biology students. The problem of botanical literacy is even more profound and has led to the official coining of the phrase Plant Blindness. This proposal explores the impact of an online intervention to cure blindness in a large-enrollment biology class.

Table: 2

Creating student “cohorts” to facilitate student-instructor engagement in large courses

Presenter: Warren Sconiers, University of the Ozarks

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Assessment

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Abstract: Courses at larger institutions tend to have fewer student-instructor interactions by nature, while smaller institutions are known for these interactions. I propose implementing cohorts, course-assigned groups of students that complete group assignments to encourage interactions and are TA/instructor managed.

Table: 3

Tree Cover Equity Across Urban Landscape Types

Presenter: Tamara Basham, Collin County Community College District

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Collaboration, Data-centric

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: In this data-focused activity, students use a combination of publicly available and self-generated data to test their hypotheses about tree cover equity across communities in the Dallas, Texas area.

Table: 4

Bacterial Fermentation of Carbohydrates

Presenter: Erin McKenney, North Carolina State University

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Collaboration

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Abstract: We present a tactile teaching tool to help students (1) compare the structures of different carbohydrates and bacterial fermentative abilities,   and (2) predict the fermentation products of different bacteria/diets and their impacts on host health.

Table: 5

Scientific Figures: Pairing Data Points with Other BioInteractive Resources

Presenter: Parks Collins, Mitchell Community College

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Assessment, Collaboration, Data-centric

Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: Interpreting figures is essential for scientists, but it is one of the most challenging skills for students to develop. Come learn about a series of resources called  Data Points that are geared towards helping students increase quantitative skills.

Table: 6

Scientists in Classrooms: PlantingScience Online Mentoring, Barriers and Opportunities

Presenter: Jennifer Hartley and Catrina Adams, Botanical Society of America

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Hands-On, Collaboration

Audience: Grades 6-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: PlantingScience is a free NSF-supported student-teacher-scientist partnership program where small teams of students in classrooms design and implement their own science investigations on one of several big themes in biology, while communicating online with a volunteer scientist mentor. We’ll discuss features of PlantingScience, how teachers have implemented particular modules within different kinds of courses, and barriers to successful implementation. We’d like feedback on ways the program can address teacher and district concerns and overcome barriers in order to reach more teachers and students. 

Table: 7

UEL: A framework for an undergraduate-focused urban ecology research community

Presenter: Maria Stanko, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Pedagogical Focus: Collaboration, Data-centric

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Abstract: The UEL is a research community established to train leaders in urban ecology and ensure that they reflect the communities they serve. We outline our research projects and discuss strategies for securing funding, recruiting students, and developing a mentoring framework.

Table: 8

Multiple Projects, One Plant: The Saguaro Cactus

Presenter: Karen Wellner, Chandler-Gilbert Community College

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: The saguaro cactus represents different things to different cultures. We examine the importance of this cactus by integrating field work, climate change, ecosystem services, geospatial technologies, and microbiology sampling in a project-based learning experience utilizing the saguaros on our campus.

Table: 9

Tracking antibiotic resistance through a sexual network

Presenter: Gabriela Hamerlinck, University of Florida

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Collaboration

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: This resource is a hands-on simulation game of how antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea might develop and spread through a sexual network.

Table: 10

Phenology Protocols in Development for the Milkweed Adaptation Research and Education Network

Presenter: Emily Mohl, St. Olaf College

Pedagogical Focus: Data-centric

Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: We will discuss a draft of newly revised protocols for a distributed investigation of common milkweed plants and their interactions with herbivores, including monarchs, to help students predict the potential for shifting phenology (timing of development) to disrupt species interactions.

Table: 11

What do scientists do?

Presenter: Laura Gonzalez, University of Texas at Austin

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Collaboration

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Abstract: What do scientists do? is a series of scaffolded assignments designed to teach students how to ask and answer scientific questions. The objective of the experiential learning activity is for students to develop a collaborative independent scientific proposal tackling an ecological question of their own choosing.

Table: 12

Assessing forest community diversity

Presenter: Andrew Kozich, Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Collaboration, Data-centric

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: Students in introductory environmental science courses benefit from hands-on learning in outdoor settings. This presentation describes a hands-on activity for students to learn basic ecological concepts about forested ecosystems and gain skills in data collection and analysis.


Saturday, October 2, 2021, 2:30 PM

Room: Emerald Mountain

Table: 1

 All hands-on all the time?

Presenter: Brent Voels, Cankdeska Cikana Community College

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning

Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: Successes and challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Could the move to online learning create new opportunities in how STEM education is delivered?

Table: 2

Constructing a multi-media active learning project in biology education

Presenter: Chinyere Knight, Tuskegee University

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning

Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

 Abstract: Students have integrated advanced understanding of biology, technology, and art by creating multi-media videos as final projects in a general ecology course during the virtual transition 2019/2020. Students incorporated animations, news broadcasts, interviews, and bio documentaries formats for content dissemination.

Table: 3

Field Sampling Methods: Impact of Invasive Species

Presenter: John Starnes, Southcentral Kentucky Community and Technical College

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Collaboration, Data-centric

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: This field-based resource is for use in a non-majors ecology laboratory.  It will explore field sampling methods and the impacts that invasive species have on the environment.

Table: 4

Case Study: Pine Barrens Ecology and Human Dimensions

Presenter: Joanna Lumbsden-Pinto, SUNY ESF

Pedagogical Focus: Collaboration, Data-centric

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division 

Abstract: Pine barrens require fire to stay healthy and provide ecosystem services users enjoy. Nevertheless, fire can jeopardize properties and people. Therefore, we can help people understand the pine barren’s ecology and change their attitude towards managing forests with fire.

Table: 5

Effects of Environmental Stress on Parasite – Host Interactions

Presenter: Tyrell Carr, Saint Augustine’s University

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Assessment, Collaboration, Data-centric

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Abstract: A Case Study – Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) for Non-Biology Majors and Biology Majors is being developed for the Biology Program at Saint Augustine’s University – Raleigh, North Carolina by Khadijah Payne and Dr. Tyrell Carr. The Case Study – CURE is centered on parasite-host interactions for studies in BIOL 131 – Fundamentals of Biology and BIOL 132 – Introduction to Environmental Science.

Table: 6

Scientific Communication in STEM: Exploring foodborne pathogens, Elements, and Healthy Eating

Presenter: Florastina Payton-Stewart

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Data-centric

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Abstract: How can we improve scientific communication among STEM and non-STEM?  Food is a universal language.  The objective is to expose students to case studies and discussions to enhance their science communication skills related to food. 

Table: 7 

Online Ecological Education via Jupyter Notebooks and NEON data

Presenter: John Sutor, SciTeens / FSU

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Data-centric

Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: SciTeens Inc. (501(c)3) engages title one high school students in STEM through online data science curriculums and research collaboration. Educators will learn about novel technologies and project-based teaching strategies adopted for a Jupyter Notebook-based curriculum.

Table: 8

Hanging on Your Every Word: Ecology for Everyone with AAAS’s Science in the Classroom (SitC)

Presenter: Anne Fernald Cross, Tulsa Community College

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Assessment, Collaboration

Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

 Abstract: This lesson introduces students to the value of scientific literature using the AAAS website Science in the Classroom. We examine the science behind the emerging infectious disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS) in the Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus).

Table: 9

Exploring Citizen Science for All Learners

Presenter: Kathryn Bender, Albemarle County Public Schools/Monticello High School

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning, Assessment, Data-centric

Audience: Grades 9-12

 Abstract: Planning citizen science projects for use in the classroom can be overwhelming.  Let’s break it down into practical ways you can differentiate a lesson into a standards-aligned, authentic, and accessible learning experience all students can engage in and benefit from.

Table: 10

Indigenous Science

Presenter: Kaitlyn Haskie, Diné College

Pedagogical Focus: Active Learning

Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Abstract: Indigenous Science refers to the scientific knowledge of peoples who as participants in their culture have traditional wisdom, values, and decision-making that inform how they interact with the world. This project draws on Navajo knowledge of traditional food systems and how effective those foods are in providing nutrition.