Field Talk » Podcast Feed https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk audio interviews take you into the field with ecologists Fri, 03 Jan 2014 01:53:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 Copyright © Field Talk 2015 podcast@esa.org podcast@esa.org 1440 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Field-Talk-Cover-4c-144.jpg.jpg Field Talk » Podcast Feed https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk 144 144 audio interviews take you into the field with ecologists podcast@esa.org no no Making room for prairie STRIPs: Lisa Schulte Moore (Land Sharing/Sparing #1) https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/making-room-for-prairie-strips-lisa-schulte-moore-land-sharingsparing-1/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/making-room-for-prairie-strips-lisa-schulte-moore-land-sharingsparing-1/#respond Tue, 19 Nov 2013 07:00:29 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=304 Read more ›]]> Field TalkField Talk

“I got kind of sick of working on environmental problems, and I wanted to work on environmental solutions. From that standpoint, agriculture — it’s like the world is your oyster. There’s so much that could be done.”

Lisa Schulte Moore, an professor of natural resource ecology and management at Iowa State University, seems to have the energy of three people. She has a hand in agricultural landscape management, bioenergy development, oak restoration, and hemlock and pine forest management, among other projects, and still makes time to drive all over Iowa, talking to farmers. In this episode of Field Talk, she explains how integrating STRIPs of prairie into conventional row crops improves water quality — and helps farms, waterways, and wildlife.

This is the first in a series of conversations springing from ideas and arguments about “land-sparing” and “land-sharing” strategies to conserve a rich tapestry of species in our human dominated world. Should we intensively farm some lands in order to preserve wildness in reserves? Accept a more flexible, less “pure,” idea of wildness, embracing conservation easements threaded into more diversified agricultural landscapes? Is this dichotomy a useful concept at all?

Soil erosion….or not. Even small amounts of perennials can have a dramatic impact on the environmental benefits provided by row-cropped agricultural lands. This image depicts the ability of native prairie to keep soil in farm fields, where it can produce crops, as opposed to allowing it to move into streams, where it becomes a serious pollutant. The STRIPS Project has shown that farm fields with just 10% of their area converted to native prairie produce diverse environmental benefits in amounts greatly disproportionate to their extent compared to fields entirely in row-crop production. This image was taken after a 4 inch rain. Caption, Lisa Schulte Moore. Photo, Dave Williams.

Soil erosion….or not. Even small amounts of perennials can have a dramatic impact on the environmental benefits provided by row-cropped agricultural lands. This image depicts the ability of native prairie to keep soil in farm fields, where it can produce crops, as opposed to allowing it to move into streams, where it becomes a serious pollutant. The STRIPS Project has shown that farm fields with just 10% of their area converted to native prairie produce diverse environmental benefits in amounts greatly disproportionate to their extent compared to fields entirely in row-crop production. This image was taken after a 4 inch rain. Caption, Lisa Schulte Moore. Photo, Dave Williams.

Show notes:

  • [0:00] song of the dickcissel (Spiza Americana), recorded by Jonathon Jongsma at Dordt College Prairie, in Sioux, Iowa in July, 2013. Background birds: red-winged blackbird, common yellowthroat, American crow, American robin.
  • [3:20] Lisa Schulte Moore’s Lab
  • [5:30] “If you’re working in agriculture, it’s going to be all about privately owned landscapes. If you want anything to stick, it’s gotta work for the people that own and manage that private land. It means working with farmers, and the people who talk to farmers.”
  • [10:10] farm policy, risk management and unintended consequences: the Energy Independence and Security Act (2007)
  • [12:28] the four big water pollutants in Iowa, nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment, and bacterial contamination, cause problems near and far.
  • [13:22] Science-based Trials of Rowcrops Integrated with Prairies (STRIPs) at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge
  • [14:30] four experimental treatments in the STRIPs pilot project
  • [23:30] birds: we can pack in more territories for dickcissels and common yellowthroats when strips are interlaced into the rowcrops than if the same amount of prairie is placed at the base of a field.
  • [27:17] stage II: putting STRIPs into working farms (pdf) – an abundance of volunteers
  • [31:26] Should agricultural policies encourage land sparing or wildlife-friendly farming? (2008) Joern Fischer, Berry Brosi, Gretchen C Daily, Paul R Ehrlich, Rebecca Goldman, Joshua Goldstein, David B Lindenmayer, Adrian D Manning, Harold A Mooney, Liba Pejchar, Jai Ranganathan, and Heather Tallis. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 6:7, 380-385.
  • [34:45] “Right now, probably the top concern in the agricultural realm itself is that soil fertility piece. How do we maintain soil quality into the future?” Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) campaign on soil quality.
  • [39:50] “What’s going to work in this place, for this farmer?”
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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/making-room-for-prairie-strips-lisa-schulte-moore-land-sharingsparing-1/feed/ 0 0:45:03 Land-Sparing/Sharing #1 Lisa Schulte Moore, an professor of natural resource ecology and management at Iowa State University, seems to have the energy of three people. She has a hand in agricultural landscape management, bioenergy development, oak restoration, and hemlock and pine forest management, among other projects, and still makes time to drive all over Iowa, talking to farmers. In this episode of Field Talk, she explains how integrating STRIPs of prairie into conventional row crops improves water quality — and helps farms, waterways, and wildlife. This is the first interview in a series exploring "land-sparing" and "land-sharing" strategies to conserve wildness and a rich tapestry of species in our human dominated world. podcast@esa.org no no
Changing climate, changing landscape: monitoring the vast wilderness of interior Alaska https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/changing-climate-changing-landscape-monitoring-the-vast-wilderness-of-interior-alaska/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/changing-climate-changing-landscape-monitoring-the-vast-wilderness-of-interior-alaska/#respond Thu, 28 Mar 2013 19:17:43 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=235 Read more ›]]> Field Talk
Reds and golds of Fall. Broadleaf shrubs flame around the ever-green of conifers in the Toklat basin ecoregion of Denali National Park. Credit, Tim Rains, Denali National Park and Preserve, 2011.

Reds and golds of Fall. Broadleaf shrubs flame around the ever-green of conifers in the Toklat basin ecoregion of Denali National Park. Credit, Tim Rains, Denali National Park and Preserve, 2011.

 

National Park Service plant ecologist Carl Roland lives in Alaska, where climate change is palpably present. Ecologists have predicted major landscape-scale changes in the future of the Alaskan interior, with a potential shift from the iconic black and white spruce boreal forest, to broadleaf trees, or even grasslands, through a combination of heat, drought, insect outbreaks, and more frequent wildfires.

But predicting the future is not simple, not when you’re talking about landscapes as large and varied as the Alaskan Interior.

Carl and his colleagues in the Alaska National Park Service’s Inventory and Monitoring program have established ongoing ecosystem assessment across the Central Alaska Network encompassing Denali, Wrangell-Saint Elias, and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Parks and Preserves.

They have just published the first chunk of data in the February issue ESA’s journal Ecological Monographs, reporting a decade of data from Denali on the distribution and abundance of southcentral Alaska’s six tree species. They established over 1000 permanent sample sites spread across 1.28 million hectares of the north side of the park, hiking into remote locations, scrambling rocky slopes and wading mountain ponds to reach randomized plots. Carl tells Liza Lester why he thinks white spruce may expand higher up mountain slopes and into thawing tundra, while the cold-loving black spruce might lose ground. He describes his efforts to make National Park Service data more accessible, and makes a plea for the complementarity of academic and government science.

Click over to ESA’s blog, EcoTone, for more photos and experimental detail. Read more about the science of Denali’s changing landscape on the NPS Alaska Regional Office website.

Landscape-scale patterns in tree occupancy and abundance in subarctic Alaska. (2013) Carl Albert Roland, Joshua H. Schmidt, and E. Fleur Nicklen. Ecological Monographs 83(1):19-48.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/changing-climate-changing-landscape-monitoring-the-vast-wilderness-of-interior-alaska/feed/ 0 0:32:40 First ten years of data from an ongoing monitoring effort sets a baseline for modeling and forestry management in Denali National Park and Preserve. National Park Service plant ecologist Carl Roland lives in Alaska, where climate change is palpably present. Ecologists have predicted major landscape-scale changes in the future of the Alaskan interior, with a potential shift from the iconic black and white spruce boreal forest, to broadleaf trees, or even grasslands, through a combination of heat, drought, insect outbreaks, and more frequent wildfires. But predicting the future is not simple, not when you’re talking about landscapes as large and varied as the Alaskan Interior. Carl tells Liza Lester why he thinks white spruce may expand higher up mountain slopes and into thawing tundra, while the cold-loving black spruce might lose ground. He describes his efforts to make National Park Service data more accessible, and makes a plea for the complementarity of academic and government science. podcast@esa.org no no
Where the ecologists are: geographical bias in field research https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/where-the-ecologists-are-geographical-bias-in-field-research/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/where-the-ecologists-are-geographical-bias-in-field-research/#respond Mon, 26 Nov 2012 13:13:46 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=227 Read more ›]]> Field TalkField Talk
“It matters because we’re facing global change – these are global phenomena, so we need global information,” said Erle Ellis, a professor of geography & environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, talking about the low resolution of ecological data from many parts of the world. A review of five years of ecological field studies, published earlier this year, showed a bias toward the protected, temperate, broadleafed forests of wealthy countries, where most ecologists make their homes. Ellis talks about some of the surprising discoveries of the review, and the challenges of defining native species ranges in a time of global change. He shares concerns about framing conservation in terms of ecosystems services, and his own journey from plant physiology through agricultural field studies in rural China, to his current work in land use and global change.

Mapping where ecologists work: biases in the global distribution of terrestrial ecological observations. Laura J Martin, Bernd Blossey, and Erle Ellis. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 2012 10:4, 195-201.

Figure 1 Martin et al Mapping where ecologists work: biases in the global distribution of terrestrial ecological observations

Image taken from Figure 1 of Martin et al.: The percentage of global ice-free terrestrial area in each anthrome category (left) as compared with the percentage of ecological sites (n = 2573) situated in each anthrome category (right). In the key, “other” refers to sites that were not densely settled or agriculture/rangeland but that did not contain adequate information to assign a protected status. Estimate of protected sites is therefore conservative.

Learn more about this project on ESA’s blog, EcoTone.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/where-the-ecologists-are-geographical-bias-in-field-research/feed/ 0 0:23:18 “It matters because we’re facing global change – these are global phenomena, so we need global information,” said Erle Ellis, a professor of geography & environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, talking about the lo[...] “It matters because we’re facing global change – these are global phenomena, so we need global information,” said Erle Ellis, a professor of geography & environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, talking about the low resolution of ecological data from many parts of the world. A review of five years of ecological field studies, published earlier this year, showed a bias toward the protected, temperate, broadleafed forests of wealthy countries, where most ecologists make their homes. podcast@esa.org no no
Tallgrass prairie: the invasion of the woody shrubs https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/tallgrass-prairie-the-invasion-of-the-woody-shrubs/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/tallgrass-prairie-the-invasion-of-the-woody-shrubs/#respond Wed, 21 Dec 2011 18:04:08 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=224 Read more ›]]> Kansas native Jesse Nippert loves the prairie. He spends much of his time immersed in the tall grass as an assistant professor at Kansas State University. Though agriculture has vastly changed the plains of North America, pockets of tall grass remain on rangeland and preserves. But the remaining tallgrass prairie, like grasslands all over the world, is changing as well, becoming, in many places, scrubland. The change is a problem for ranchers and an absorbing mystery for grassland ecologists. Jesse explains indications of positive feedbacks promoting the creeping spread of woody shrubs into the tallgrass prairie, from his paper in the November edition of Ecosphere, ESA’s new online-only, open-access journal.

Learn more about tallgrass prairie, C4 grasses, and the Konza Long Term Ecological Research site in the accompanying post on ESA’s blog, Ecotone.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/tallgrass-prairie-the-invasion-of-the-woody-shrubs/feed/ 0 0:19:07 Kansas native Jesse Nippert loves the prairie. He spends much of his time immersed in the tall grass as an assistant professor at Kansas State University. Though agriculture has vastly changed the plains of North America, pockets of tall grass remai[...] Kansas native Jesse Nippert loves the prairie. He spends much of his time immersed in the tall grass as an assistant professor at Kansas State University. Though agriculture has vastly changed the plains of North America, pockets of tall grass remain on rangeland and preserves. But the remaining tallgrass prairie, like grasslands all over the world, is changing as well, becoming, in many places, scrubland. The change is a problem for ranchers and an absorbing mystery for grassland ecologists. Jesse explains indications of positive feedbacks promoting the creeping spread of woody shrubs into the tallgrass prairie, from his paper in the November edition of Ecosphere, ESA’s new online-only, open-access journal. Learn more about tallgrass prairie, C4 grasses, and the Konza Long Term Ecological Research site in the accompanying post on ESA’s blog, Ecotone. podcast@esa.org no no
Immersed in the clouds: Interview with tropical cloud forest researcher https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/immersed-in-the-clouds-interview-with-tropical-cloud-forest-researcher/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/immersed-in-the-clouds-interview-with-tropical-cloud-forest-researcher/#respond Fri, 04 Mar 2011 15:41:08 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=217 Read more ›]]> Greg Goldsmith, tropical plant ecologist from the University of California, BerkeleyThere is a world within the canopy of a tropical cloud forest that not many people get to see. In this unique ecosystem – maintained by the exceptionally wet microclimate of cloud cover—orchids, moss, lichens and other epiphytes grow in every crease and pocket of the supporting tree branches. Here, hundreds of species of birds, monkeys and other mammal pollinators navigate the aerial landscape, scattering seeds along the way (see below video).

Greg Goldsmith, tropical plant ecologist from the University of California, Berkeley, spends his days harnessed in this “canopy in the clouds”—the name of the interactive, educational website he is currently working on with photographer Drew Fulton and cinematographer Colin Witherill. Read more in the EcoTone post.

Photo Credit: Drew Fulton

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/immersed-in-the-clouds-interview-with-tropical-cloud-forest-researcher/feed/ 0 0:07:51 There is a world within the canopy of a tropical cloud forest that not many people get to see. In this unique ecosystem – maintained by the exceptionally wet microclimate of cloud cover—orchids, moss, lichens and other epiphytes grow in every [...] There is a world within the canopy of a tropical cloud forest that not many people get to see. In this unique ecosystem – maintained by the exceptionally wet microclimate of cloud cover—orchids, moss, lichens and other epiphytes grow in every crease and pocket of the supporting tree branches. Here, hundreds of species of birds, monkeys and other mammal pollinators navigate the aerial landscape, scattering seeds along the way (see below video). Greg Goldsmith, tropical plant ecologist from the University of California, Berkeley, spends his days harnessed in this “canopy in the clouds”—the name of the interactive, educational website he is currently working on with photographer Drew Fulton and cinematographer Colin Witherill. Read more in the EcoTone post. Photo Credit: Drew Fulton podcast@esa.org no no
Taking a shot at photographing science and nature https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/taking-a-shot-at-photographing-science-and-nature/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/taking-a-shot-at-photographing-science-and-nature/#respond Thu, 30 Dec 2010 21:49:01 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=209 Read more ›]]> Ecologist and photographer Molly Mehling Some projects implement photography as a means for exploring societal and environmental issues. One such project is gigapan.org, which allows users to share and discuss panoramic photographs (one of the most famous gigapans is of the 2009 Inauguration of President Barack Obama). Ecologist and photographer Molly Mehling uses gigapan to capture research and encourage conversation and collaboration about science, nature and sustainability.

In a recent interview for EcoTone, Mehling discussed opportunities for incorporating photography into research and the ways in which images can convey messages about science and nature. Photography can put viewers at the foot of a receding glacier or face-to-face with a humpback whale.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/taking-a-shot-at-photographing-science-and-nature/feed/ 0 0:07:19 Some projects implement photography as a means for exploring societal and environmental issues. One such project is gigapan.org, which allows users to share and discuss panoramic photographs (one of the most famous gigapans is of the 2009 Inaugurati[...] Some projects implement photography as a means for exploring societal and environmental issues. One such project is gigapan.org, which allows users to share and discuss panoramic photographs (one of the most famous gigapans is of the 2009 Inauguration of President Barack Obama). Ecologist and photographer Molly Mehling uses gigapan to capture research and encourage conversation and collaboration about science, nature and sustainability. In a recent interview for EcoTone, Mehling discussed opportunities for incorporating photography into research and the ways in which images can convey messages about science and nature. Photography can put viewers at the foot of a receding glacier or face-to-face with a humpback whale. podcast@esa.org no no
Spearfishing to depletion in Chile https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/spearfishing-to-depletion-in-chile/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/spearfishing-to-depletion-in-chile/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2010 20:19:43 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=203 Read more ›]]> Spearfishers in Chile

Spearfishers in Chile

In theory, the evolution of scuba gear and wetsuits in spearfishing allow divers to produce a more abundant catch. However, Natalio Godoy from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and colleagues found that the spearfishers’ catches are becoming less diverse and abundant in the temperate reefs in northern and central Chile. The result, as they suggest in a recent study published in Ecological Applications, is likely due in part to the spearfishing activities themselves.

Godoy and colleagues used several methods to obtain information on the state of reef fish communities in Chile since records of spearfishing activities, and landing records specific to certain regions, are not required by the government. Therefore, the researchers examined data from nation-wide official landing records, the catch from the top 20 divers in the 1971 and 2004 world spearfishing championships and the perceptions of local spearfishers.

They found that the average mass of reef fish captured decreased, the percentage of discarded fish decreased and the total number of species caught decreased drastically in the 30 year span between championships. The interviews, on the other hand, contributed an even greater understanding of the status of the fisheries: Divers reported that they were catching, and local markets were accepting, species of fish that were not consumed just 10-15 years ago.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/spearfishing-to-depletion-in-chile/feed/ 0 0:13:35 Spearfishers in Chile In theory, the evolution of scuba gear and wetsuits in spearfishing allow divers to produce a more abundant catch. However, Natalio Godoy from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and colleagues found that the spearfish[...] Spearfishers in Chile In theory, the evolution of scuba gear and wetsuits in spearfishing allow divers to produce a more abundant catch. However, Natalio Godoy from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and colleagues found that the spearfishers’ catches are becoming less diverse and abundant in the temperate reefs in northern and central Chile. The result, as they suggest in a recent study published in Ecological Applications, is likely due in part to the spearfishing activities themselves. Godoy and colleagues used several methods to obtain information on the state of reef fish communities in Chile since records of spearfishing activities, and landing records specific to certain regions, are not required by the government. Therefore, the researchers examined data from nation-wide official landing records, the catch from the top 20 divers in the 1971 and 2004 world spearfishing championships and the perceptions of local spearfishers. They found that the average mass of reef fish captured decreased, the percentage of discarded fish decreased and the total number of species caught decreased drastically in the 30 year span between championships. The interviews, on the other hand, contributed an even greater understanding of the status of the fisheries: Divers reported that they were catching, and local markets were accepting, species of fish that were not consumed just 10-15 years ago. podcast@esa.org no no
Injecting humor into climate change https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/injecting-humor-into-climate-change/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/injecting-humor-into-climate-change/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2010 21:44:12 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=207 Read more ›]]> Many science communicators suggest that the key to effectively translating climate change research is to keep the message concise, accurate and interesting, all in one tight package. Perhaps the most streamlined of platforms to communicate this science is a comic strip in which the cartoonist has just a few panels to neatly and accurately convey the findings, the alternative viewpoint and the gravity of the issue at hand. Oh, and it should be funny too.

That is a tall order for even the best of communicators, but if it is pulled off, it is arguably the most dynamic and effective platform for engaging people in environmental issues. Neil Wagner, illustrator and writer of the blog and comic strip “What On Earth?” on NPR’s Science Friday program, uses humor to tackle the issue of global climate change and other environmental challenges, such as the effect of invasive species on the coffee industry. He discusses the challenges and pleasures of communicating climate change through his comic strip in a recent interview for EcoTone.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/injecting-humor-into-climate-change/feed/ 0 0:08:22 Many science communicators suggest that the key to effectively translating climate change research is to keep the message concise, accurate and interesting, all in one tight package. Perhaps the most streamlined of platforms to communicate this scie[...] Many science communicators suggest that the key to effectively translating climate change research is to keep the message concise, accurate and interesting, all in one tight package. Perhaps the most streamlined of platforms to communicate this science is a comic strip in which the cartoonist has just a few panels to neatly and accurately convey the findings, the alternative viewpoint and the gravity of the issue at hand. Oh, and it should be funny too. That is a tall order for even the best of communicators, but if it is pulled off, it is arguably the most dynamic and effective platform for engaging people in environmental issues. Neil Wagner, illustrator and writer of the blog and comic strip “What On Earth?” on NPR’s Science Friday program, uses humor to tackle the issue of global climate change and other environmental challenges, such as the effect of invasive species on the coffee industry. He discusses the challenges and pleasures of communicating climate change through his comic strip in a recent interview for EcoTone. podcast@esa.org no no
Considering canopy cover in Ecuador https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/considering-canopy-cover-in-ecuador/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/considering-canopy-cover-in-ecuador/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2010 17:26:28 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=199 Read more ›]]> Jason Tylianakis

Jason Tylianakis

Loss of canopy cover in rainforests—compared to the other fragmented habitats in Manabi in southwest Ecuador—leads to a region-wide loss of diversity in species interactions, said researchers from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. As Jason Tilianakis and Etienne Laliberté reported in the June issue of Ecology, the food webs and interactions between parasitoids and their bee and wasp hosts were simplified and homogenized across habitats. As it turns out, land use was not the major contributor to this loss of interaction diversity: The researchers proposed that the lack of canopy cover in the managed and abandoned coffee agroforests and pasture and rice fields allowed for easier access as parasitoids searched for their bee and wasp hosts. In this edition of Field Talk, Jason Tylianakis discusses his findings, the fragmented habitats of Ecuador and the Homogecene era.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/considering-canopy-cover-in-ecuador/feed/ 0 0:10:46 Jason Tylianakis Loss of canopy cover in rainforests—compared to the other fragmented habitats in Manabi in southwest Ecuador—leads to a region-wide loss of diversity in species interactions, said researchers from the University of Canterbury in New[...] Jason Tylianakis Loss of canopy cover in rainforests—compared to the other fragmented habitats in Manabi in southwest Ecuador—leads to a region-wide loss of diversity in species interactions, said researchers from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. As Jason Tilianakis and Etienne Laliberté reported in the June issue of Ecology, the food webs and interactions between parasitoids and their bee and wasp hosts were simplified and homogenized across habitats. As it turns out, land use was not the major contributor to this loss of interaction diversity: The researchers proposed that the lack of canopy cover in the managed and abandoned coffee agroforests and pasture and rice fields allowed for easier access as parasitoids searched for their bee and wasp hosts. In this edition of Field Talk, Jason Tylianakis discusses his findings, the fragmented habitats of Ecuador and the Homogecene era. podcast@esa.org no no
Fruitful Savannahs: Termites enrich the soil in East Africa https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/fruitful-savannahs-termites-enrich-the-soil-in-east-africa/ https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/fruitful-savannahs-termites-enrich-the-soil-in-east-africa/#respond Thu, 15 Apr 2010 17:56:11 +0000 http://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/?p=194 Read more ›]]> Alison Brody from the University of Vermont Vertebrate fertilizer is not the only source of nutrients in the soils of East African savannahs, at least according to a study recently published in the journal Ecology. Alison Brody from the University of Vermont and colleagues found that termites actually had more of an effect on the fruiting success of Acacia trees in Kenya than did dung and urine deposition from ungulate herbivores, such as zebras and gazelles. The underground termite mounds, covered in vegetation and ranging from 5-10 meters in size, increased nitrogen and other nutrients in the soil—significantly more so than ungulates typically provided. In this edition of Field Talk, Brody talks about the symbiotic relationships these Acacia trees have with vertebrates and invertebrates, her plans for future research on the effects of cattle grazing on this land and her experiences in the field with the Kenya Long-term Exclosure Experiment.

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https://www.esa.org/fieldtalk/fruitful-savannahs-termites-enrich-the-soil-in-east-africa/feed/ 0 0:12:20 Vertebrate fertilizer is not the only source of nutrients in the soils of East African savannahs, at least according to a study recently published in the journal Ecology. Alison Brody from the University of Vermont and colleagues found that termites[...] Vertebrate fertilizer is not the only source of nutrients in the soils of East African savannahs, at least according to a study recently published in the journal Ecology. Alison Brody from the University of Vermont and colleagues found that termites actually had more of an effect on the fruiting success of Acacia trees in Kenya than did dung and urine deposition from ungulate herbivores, such as zebras and gazelles. The underground termite mounds, covered in vegetation and ranging from 5-10 meters in size, increased nitrogen and other nutrients in the soil—significantly more so than ungulates typically provided. In this edition of Field Talk, Brody talks about the symbiotic relationships these Acacia trees have with vertebrates and invertebrates, her plans for future research on the effects of cattle grazing on this land and her experiences in the field with the Kenya Long-term Exclosure Experiment. podcast@esa.org no no