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Early Career Section

We are an organization dedicated to meeting the needs of early career ecologists in the Ecological Society of America. “Early career” is broadly defined as any post-graduate individual who currently has less than 8 years of full-time employment in an ecology-related position, or otherwise self-identifies as early career.

What We Do

Early Career Includes

Early Career Includes

Early career individuals may include postdoctoral researchers, assistant professors, lecturers, adjunct faculty members, and employees of government, non-profit, advocacy, university, and industrial scientific entities. However, section membership will be open to any member of the Society

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Early Career Mentoring Program

Early Career Mentoring Program

The mentorship program pairs selected early career ecologists (mentees) with an established scientist in their field (mentor) who has agreed to meet one-on-one for career guidance.

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Purpose

Purpose

The overall purpose of the Early Career Ecologist Section is to provide support to this sizeable demographic of the Society in the transitional period of their professional development (i.e. from student to professional). Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to, the job search process, tenure and promotion, non-academic career options, securing research funding, course development, and fulfilling committee and other service responsibilities.

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News

  • On the challenges of life as a graduate student, scientist, and new mom

    By Amanda J Gorton I was three weeks postpartum when I received the news that my post-doc fellowship had been selected for funding. My immediate feelings were a mixture of relief, excitement, and sheer panic. I was relieved that I had secured my next position and would not be unemployed after defending my PhD. I was excited to move in…

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  • Differential Gene Expression: successful parenting strategies for Caribbean coral

    by Krti Tallam Note from the Author: Nia Symone Walker is a 4th year PhD Candidate at Stanford University. Nia received her degree in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology from Harvard University in 2016.  Prior to her graduate studies, Nia conducted research as a Science Educator for the Maritime Aquarium’s classrooms, supported by NOAA’s Environmental Literacy Grants Program. Nia primarily uses…

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  • Conflict Mitigation or Coexistence?

    Three elephants walking across a sandy road, with forest in the background. On the left is the biggest elephant, and to her right is a baby. The third elephant is on the baby elephant's right side. All three are looking at the photographer.

    Krti Tallam At the age of 13, my eagerness to make real-world impact, coupled with a thirst for environmental conservation and human wellbeing, fueled me to create an internship with an international conservation organization and then travel there to fill that spot. A day after final exams, I found myself in the remote Western Ghats of south India, studying Asian…

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  • Why I left academia after getting my PhD

    I am a community marine ecologist by training. My PhD consisted of me driving a boat to conduct fieldwork in a wetsuit in Moorea, French Polynesia. Now, I am a Research Staff Member at the Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI), a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)….

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