Member Highlight: New Publishing opportunity as The Bulletin of ESA launches “Communicating Science” section

Member Highlight: New Publishing opportunity as The Bulletin of ESA launches “Communicating Science” section

Effective November 2018, The Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America will accept submissions for consideration in a new section dedicated to Communicating Science. All articles published in the series are free to publish and freely available via open access. This new space in the journal provides ESA members interested in communication and engagement aRead more about Member Highlight: New Publishing opportunity as The Bulletin of ESA launches “Communicating Science” section[…]

Member Highlight: New Articles on Role of National Parks in History of Ecology & More

Member Highlight: New Articles on Role of National Parks in History of Ecology & More

New Web Articles on National Parks in the History of Science National parks in the United States have hosted some of the most significant and influential research projects in ecology and other fields. Many of those studies have launched new lines of inquiry, revealed new taxa, informed foundational ideas in a variety of disciplines, providedRead more about Member Highlight: New Articles on Role of National Parks in History of Ecology & More[…]

Resource of the Week: “Rapid Ecology” blog (resource & publishing opportunity)

Resource of the Week: “Rapid Ecology” blog (resource & publishing opportunity)

Image: screenshot from the submission guidelines page From Rapid Ecology’s About page:  “Why Rapid Ecology? Science community blogs are often driving the conversation among ecologists, yet most of us do not have access to publishing in blogs. The visibility of a major blog shouldn’t be a resource limited to a small number of people. If you have somethingRead more about Resource of the Week: “Rapid Ecology” blog (resource & publishing opportunity)[…]

SciComm Lit Review: Skylar Bayer reviews “Writing Science in Plain English”

SciComm Lit Review: Skylar Bayer reviews “Writing Science in Plain English”

I feel like I have found a reference to keep on my shelf for the rest of my career […] In fact, after reading Writing Science in Plain English, I want to go back and edit every journal article I have ever written. ~S. Bayer

WritingScienceInPlainEnglish-bookcover

What is the reviewer’s motive (expertise, curiosity, sharing lessons learned, etc.) and perspective (research scientist, educator, science communicator, etc.)? 

I am a scientist, a researcher, a science communicator, and a hopeful future educator. Currently I am a Sea Grant Knauss marine science policy fellow. I love learning how to communicate science in different and more effective ways. I went to school during an era without much instruction on the rules of grammar, and most of what I learned about the rules of writing in English was through osmosis. For at least a decade I have longed for a simple, effective guide on science writing.

Who can benefit from reading and referencing this SciComm Lit (researchers, reporters, science communicators, educators, students, etc.)? 

Writing Science in Plain English will be helpful for guiding any form of writing through which science needs to be communicated clearly to an audience – manuscripts, blog posts, popular science, etc. Undergraduate and graduate students may benefit the most from referencing Writing Science in Plain English. I wish I’d had this book when I struggled with learning how to craft more exciting (but accurate) text for my early papers.

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Some of Skylar’s marginal notes

I feel like I have found a reference to keep on my shelf for the rest of my career. As an educator, I would use this as a guide for teaching science writing and for editing student papers. As a researcher, I will definitely reference this book as I continue to write manuscripts. In fact, after reading Writing Science in Plain English, I want to go back and edit every journal article I have ever written. Read more about SciComm Lit Review: Skylar Bayer reviews “Writing Science in Plain English”

Wanted: You! Nominations now open for 2018-2020 chair-elect position

Wanted: You! Nominations now open for 2018-2020 chair-elect position

(Photo by Bethann Garramon Merkle, ©2018) As we mentioned in the April newsletter, nominations are now open for the next Communication and Engagement Section chairperson-elect. If you are looking for a way to enhance your scicomm skills while contributing to others’, this is a fantastic opportunity. It’s also a great way to learn more about howRead more about Wanted: You! Nominations now open for 2018-2020 chair-elect position[…]

SciComm Lit Review: Jennifer Purrenhage reviews “Talk like TED: The 9 public-speaking secrets of the world’s top minds”

SciComm Lit Review: Jennifer Purrenhage reviews “Talk like TED: The 9 public-speaking secrets of the world’s top minds”

When I first read this book, I was so inspired that I set out to transform every lecture in my Gen-Ed course into a TED talk. ~ J. Purrenhage

talk like ted

What is the reviewer’s motive (expertise, curiosity, sharing lessons learned, etc.) and perspective (research scientist, educator, science communicator, etc.)? 

I am a scientist and a science educator. As a lecturer in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of New Hampshire, and the current Secretary of ESA’s Science Communication Section, I love reading about science communication, and about improving communication in general, both for selfish reasons (personal and professional development) and for my students. I teach the theory and practice of science communication to undergrad majors and non-majors in all my courses.

Who can benefit from reading and referencing this SciComm Lit (researchers, reporters, science communicators, educators, students, etc.)? 

Anyone whose objective is to communicate a story to a live audience (especially if you have watched TED talks and wished that’s how you reached your audience) can benefit from reading this book.

Gallo did not focus on science communication, but scientists are among his examples. The observations, insights, and tips included in this book will speak differently to each of us depending on our roles and our goals. I refer to this book when re-designing my lectures, mentoring students on preparing research presentations, teaching about science communication, and speaking to audiences of colleagues. Many students and colleagues have purchased their own copy of this book after borrowing mine or hearing my favorite tips.

When I first read this book, I was so inspired that I set out to transform every lecture in my Gen-Ed course into a TED talk. Read more about SciComm Lit Review: Jennifer Purrenhage reviews “Talk like TED: The 9 public-speaking secrets of the world’s top minds”

Announcing new SciComm/Engagement Lit Review series!

Announcing new SciComm/Engagement Lit Review series!

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By Christopher Michel from San Francisco, USA (Ladakh) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Our SciComm/Engagement Lit Review series launches this week!

The Lit Review series features contributed reviews of books and other scicomm and engagement resources. Reviews provide unique content about lit that has direct or indirect relevance to the wide range of scicomm careers, approaches, and interests of Section members.

We seek SciComm/Engagement Lit Reviews (book review-style), and we welcome co-authored reviews. Read more about Announcing new SciComm/Engagement Lit Review series!