#MySciComm: You’re gonna need a bigger online outreach strategy: How Dr. David Shiffman uses social media to teach the world about sharks

#MySciComm: You’re gonna need a bigger online outreach strategy: How Dr. David Shiffman uses social media to teach the world about sharks

This week, Dr. David Shiffman responds to the #MySciComm questions! 

*Editor’s note: David is available Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (the date of publication) to answer questions you may have about what it’s like to be a science communicator, how he got into it, and sharks, of course! Connect with him in the comments, or on Twitter and Facebook (use #MySciComm so he sees it).

Headshot of a man standing on a doc; several small sailboats are moored behind him.
David Shiffman in Miami, Florida, after a shark research trip during his PhD (Photo by Josh Liberman)

Dr. David Shiffman is a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Conservation Biology at Simon Fraser University, where he studies the conservation and management of sharks. He has been interviewed for over 200 mainstream media articles, and has bylines with the Washington Post, Scientific American, Slate, Gizmodo, and more. He is also an award-winning public educator who has used social media to answer thousands of people’s questions about sharks, and has taught over 500 scientists how to use social media to communicate their research to the public. Connect with him on twitter @WhySharksMatter and Facebook

The #MySciComm series features a host of SciComm professionals. We’re looking for more contributors, so please get in touch if you’d like to write a post!

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Okay, David…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

SHARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRK!

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Resource of the Week: Paper about using Twitter to increase student engagement in an undergraduate field biology course

Resource of the Week: Paper about using Twitter to increase student engagement in an undergraduate field biology course

Abstract:  Twitter is a cold medium that allows users to deliver content-rich but small packets of information to other users, and provides an opportunity for active and collaborative communication. In an education setting, this social media tool has potential to increase active learning opportunities, and increase student engagement with course content. The effects of TwitterRead more about Resource of the Week: Paper about using Twitter to increase student engagement in an undergraduate field biology course[…]

New Frontiers in Eco-Communication

New Frontiers in Eco-Communication

Today in the Hyatt hallway, I passed a colleague with an imposing nametag terraced by four colors of ribbon. He is an ESA donor, a moderator, and two other things I can’t recall (possibly a juggler).

This year my nametag has a ribbon, too.

It’s a regular reminder that even though scicomm workshop 15 is done, my duty to communicate ecology’s stories remains.

The media label has a storied root – medium: an artistic material or form; the happy state between two extremes; the substrate where organisms grow in a lab.

It feels like an encouragement to explore new forms of expression: to try, for example, sketching conference notes as illustrations – a departure from my usual writerly toolkit.

Notes from COS 45 – Ecosystem Services Assessment – by Clarisse Hart

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Multimedia SciComm Resource Guide

Multimedia SciComm Resource Guide

This resource guide is meant to inspire and empower – not only are there great examples, but we’ve provided practical advice about why, how, and when each media type can help you get your message across. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 International License. Please review the license terms beforeRead more about Multimedia SciComm Resource Guide[…]

Resources: General SciComm

Resources: General SciComm

*This list is dynamic, and in-development. Feel free to make suggestions (use the comments section or contact us directly) re additional resources and great examples that should be included. GETTING STARTED: The “Self-Promotion” Dilemma Why researchers should interact with the public by Karen McKee, The Scientist Videographer, 24 June 2014. Making peace with self promotion by LizRead more about Resources: General SciComm[…]