Resource of the Week: Women in STEM Ambassadors (training/funding opportunity with AAAS)

Resource of the Week: Women in STEM Ambassadors (training/funding opportunity with AAAS)

              Applications for the AAAS IF/THEN Ambassadors program are being accepted April 1 – July 21, 2019. The AAAS IF/THEN Ambassadors program will bring together 100 US-based women from a variety of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers to serve as high-profile role models for middle school girls.Read more about Resource of the Week: Women in STEM Ambassadors (training/funding opportunity with AAAS)[…]

#MySciComm: Sarah Schneider on the at-times winding road from academia to academic publishing

#MySciComm: Sarah Schneider on the at-times winding road from academia to academic publishing

This week, Sarah Schneider (of ESA’s Editorial Office/publications) responds to the #MySciComm questions! We’re delighted to share her story with you, as it is a window into a type of SciComm career that is pivotal to how we do science.

Woman in hat smiling at camera
You can take the ecologist out of the field, but you can’t take the field out of the ecologist. Sarah Schneider applying her backcountry research experience to a hiking trip in Shenandoah National Park. (Photo credit: Virginia Sawyer)

Sarah Schneider has worked for the Publications Office of the Ecological Society of America since 2013. These days, she works primarily on Ecosphere, ESA’s open access journal, and on the society Bulletin. Sarah worked as a paralegal, lab technician, farmhand, museum curator, and archivist before finding her calling in science publishing. She has a Bachelor’s from Cornell University and a Master’s in Ecology from the University of Maine. You can connect with her at sarah@esa.org.

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Okay, Sarah…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

I “decided” on a career in science early in life.

Read more about #MySciComm: Sarah Schneider on the at-times winding road from academia to academic publishing

Resource of the Week: The importance of storytelling in science

Resource of the Week: The importance of storytelling in science

Numerous articles, resources, podcasts, and whole ventures (e.g., StoryCorps; The Moth) address key aspects of narrative and storytelling that are valuable (even essential) for sharing science. See the following articles for a few we find particularly helpful, insightful, or thought-provoking. These resources may change how you do things and/or provide you with useful citations toRead more about Resource of the Week: The importance of storytelling in science[…]

#MySciComm: Johanna Varner on the personal interactions that make a big difference

#MySciComm: Johanna Varner on the personal interactions that make a big difference

This week, Johanna “Pika Jo” Varner responds to the #MySciComm questions! We’re thrilled to share her story with you, not least because she was the originator and on-going inspiration for our annual #SketchYourScience activity at the C&E Section booth at annual meetings.

Smiling woman sitting on lichen-covered rocks; clearly in high-alpine environment (snow-covered mountain peaks visible in background)
Johanna Varner is an ecologist who studies how alpine mammals cope with changing climate conditions. She has developed several citizen science initiatives to engage the public in helping to monitor the status and distribution of pikas in both Utah and Oregon (photo courtesy of T. Walla)

 

Johanna Varner is an ecologist who studies how climate change affects pikas, small mammals closely related to rabbits. She is currently an assistant professor of biology at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction, CO, but her path to ecology was far from linear. Over the course of her transformation from a MIT bioengineer to an organic farmer to a pika ecologist, she became passionate about SciComm, teaching, and including citizen scientists in her research. One group of students nicknamed her “Pika Jo”, a name which she has embraced for her SciComm work. Along the way, she discovered that her personal obsession with pikas is actually ideal for engaging people in the local effects of climate change. She was recently honored for her diverse contributions to SciComm with the AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement in Science. Follow her on twitter @johannavarner.

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Okay, Pika Jo…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

I actually started out as a bioengineer.

Read more about #MySciComm: Johanna Varner on the personal interactions that make a big difference

Resource of the Week: Truth in Science (Neither Absolute Nor Timeless)

Resource of the Week: Truth in Science (Neither Absolute Nor Timeless)

In this article from Aeon, Dr. Michela Massimi takes on the essential-yet-complex role of truth in science. Philosophical, thought-provoking, and essential reading. Lots to ponder in here about how truth gets portrayed, how perceptions of what is true change, notions of truth vs. consensus, and the implications of these nuances and fluidity for public trust inRead more about Resource of the Week: Truth in Science (Neither Absolute Nor Timeless)[…]

Member Highlight: Introducing newly elected C&E Section Officers

Member Highlight: Introducing newly elected C&E Section Officers

In our February 2019 newsletter, we introduced our newly elected Communication & Engagement Section officers. They will join the leadership team in August 2019. Below are their responses to the elections nomination form questionnaire. Robert Newman, 2019-2020 Chair-elect Describe who you are and your interests in science communication and engagement. I am a professor in the BiologyRead more about Member Highlight: Introducing newly elected C&E Section Officers[…]

Resource of the Week: Visualization Tips for Small Data Sets/Sample Sizes

Resource of the Week: Visualization Tips for Small Data Sets/Sample Sizes

According to Tracey L. Weissgerber, Natasa M. Milic, Stacey J. Winham, and Vesna D. Garovic, proper representation of small data sets and sample sizes allows accurate interpretation. Doing so, they assert, requires displaying continuous data. But, they write, “Most papers presented continuous data in bar and line graphs. This is problematic, as many different data distributionsRead more about Resource of the Week: Visualization Tips for Small Data Sets/Sample Sizes[…]

Resource of the Week: Atomic Hands ASL accessibility for STEM

Resource of the Week: Atomic Hands ASL accessibility for STEM

According to their website, Atomic Hands‘ mission is: “Atomic Hands is committed to increasing public accessibility to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through American Sign Language and fostering collaboration and networking opportunities among current and future Deaf STEMists.” Their website includes resources for communities, K-12 schools, and universities, along with ASL Stem dictionaries andRead more about Resource of the Week: Atomic Hands ASL accessibility for STEM[…]

#MySciComm: Marty Downs on finding a home in the field of science communication

#MySciComm: Marty Downs on finding a home in the field of science communication

This week, Marty Downs responds to the #MySciComm questions! 

Woman smiling at camera

Marty is the Deputy Director of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network Communications Office, based at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) in Santa Barbara.  She manages internal and external communications for a network of over 2000 environmental scientists and 28 diverse research sites. Marty began her career as an ecosystem ecologist studying nitrogen and carbon cycling in northeastern U.S. forests, with occasional forays to Alaska and Sweden. While teaching a group of science journalism fellows the reality of hands-on science, she caught the science communication bug. She earned a master’s in science journalism from Boston University and launched a career in freelance science writing and, later, institutional communications. For the past decade, her work has involved using science communication to accelerate collaboration and interdisciplinary synthesis.

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Okay, Marty…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

I guess I should start with…what kind of SciComm do I do?

Read more about #MySciComm: Marty Downs on finding a home in the field of science communication