Resource of the Week: Webinars from Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting

Resource of the Week: Webinars from Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting

Excerpt from website: “Metcalf Institute webinars feature leading scientists, policy makers, and communicators in a variety of fields to help news consumers make sense of complex science and environment issues.  The seminars are archived on Metcalf Institute’s YouTube channel. Metcalf Institute webinars are part of our Climate Change and the News Initiative, developed to assist journalists in coveringRead more about Resource of the Week: Webinars from Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting[…]

#MySciComm: Marty Downs on finding a home in the field of science communication

#MySciComm: Marty Downs on finding a home in the field of science communication

This week, Marty Downs responds to the #MySciComm questions! 

Woman smiling at camera

Marty is the Deputy Director of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network Communications Office, based at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) in Santa Barbara.  She manages internal and external communications for a network of over 2000 environmental scientists and 28 diverse research sites. Marty began her career as an ecosystem ecologist studying nitrogen and carbon cycling in northeastern U.S. forests, with occasional forays to Alaska and Sweden. While teaching a group of science journalism fellows the reality of hands-on science, she caught the science communication bug. She earned a master’s in science journalism from Boston University and launched a career in freelance science writing and, later, institutional communications. For the past decade, her work has involved using science communication to accelerate collaboration and interdisciplinary synthesis.

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Okay, Marty…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

I guess I should start with…what kind of SciComm do I do?

Read more about #MySciComm: Marty Downs on finding a home in the field of science communication

Resource of the Week: Science Media Centre of Canada’s tips for interacting with journalists and the media

Resource of the Week: Science Media Centre of Canada’s tips for interacting with journalists and the media

“The Science Media Centre of Canada is a registered charitable organization that supports journalists writing about the sciences, engineering and technology.” The Science Media Centre of Canada will: work with you to help your research reach journalists list your research in an embargo-controlled weekly newsletter tailored for journalists teach workshops for you share its free resourcesRead more about Resource of the Week: Science Media Centre of Canada’s tips for interacting with journalists and the media[…]

#MySciComm: Caitlin Looby on breaking into science journalism without quitting science

#MySciComm: Caitlin Looby on breaking into science journalism without quitting science

This week, Dr. Caitlin Looby, a SciComm Section member, responds to the #MySciComm questions!

caitlin looby picture
Photo courtesy of Aaron Black-Schmidt

Caitlin Looby is a scientist and a freelance science writer. She earned her PhD in Biology from the University of California, Irvine, her M.S. in Biotechnology at Kean University, and her B.S. in Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Connecticut. During graduate school, Caitlin found a new passion, motivator, and purpose in science communication. She recently traded ocean views for mountain views, and lives in Colorado. Connect with Caitlin on @caitlooby, through email, or on her website.

The #MySciComm series features a host of SciComm professionals. We’re looking for more contributors, so please get in touch if you’d like to write a post!

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Okay, Caitlin…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

In graduate school, I realized that I couldn’t wait to finish a study so I could write about it.

Read more about #MySciComm: Caitlin Looby on breaking into science journalism without quitting science

#MySciComm: Katie Burke on forging a path from science to science journalism

#MySciComm: Katie Burke on forging a path from science to science journalism

This week, Katie L. Burke responds to the #MySciComm questions!

burke

Photo courtesy of Katie L. Burke

Katie is the Digital Features Editor at American Scientist magazine. She holds a PhD in biology (ecology and evolution) from the University of Virginia, where she studied conservation biology in eastern deciduous forests of North America. As a journalist and editor with American Scientist, she helps scientists tell their stories, share the wonder of science, and discuss barriers to learning and doing better science. Connect with her @_klburke and the-understory.com.

The #MySciComm series features a host of SciComm professionals. We’re looking for more contributors, so please get in touch if you’d like to write a post!

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Okay, Katie…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

I considered going into science writing multiple times—even before I went to graduate school.

Read more about #MySciComm: Katie Burke on forging a path from science to science journalism

Resources: Science journalism

Resources: Science journalism

*This list is dynamic, and in-development. Feel free to make suggestions (use the comments section or contact us directly) re additional resources and great examples that should be included. INTERACTING WITH THE MEDIA Tips for dealing with reporters Tips for PR (public relations) writing Writing a Press Release: Death by Six-Shooter Peter Campbell, Public Information Officer –Read more about Resources: Science journalism[…]