Resource of the Week: Curing “Plant Blindness” vs. Growing Plant Love

Resource of the Week: Curing “Plant Blindness” vs. Growing Plant Love

Last year, we featured two #MySciComm posts by co-founders of Plant Love Stories, and at #ESA2018, we hosted Plant Love Stories at our booth at the Annual Meeting. Now, we’re highlighting a related publication informed by that project: a commentary in the journal Plants, People, Planet (published by the New Phytologist Trust). They write: We haveRead more about Resource of the Week: Curing “Plant Blindness” vs. Growing Plant Love[…]

Resource of the Week: Join the new online research community ‘Visual Arts in Science Education’

Resource of the Week: Join the new online research community ‘Visual Arts in Science Education’

Jennifer Landin, a scientific illustrator and NC State professor, has launched an online group focused on research on the use of visuals/art in science education. She aims to connect and create a community across the art, communication, science, and education fields. VASE (Visual Arts in Science Education), with the goals of: 1) sharing ideas amongRead more about Resource of the Week: Join the new online research community ‘Visual Arts in Science Education’[…]

Resource of the Week: #SciComm & #PrideMonth

Resource of the Week: #SciComm & #PrideMonth

It is Pride Month! Here are a few resources on representation, inclusion, and intersectionality with science. Stay tuned for more in our Resource of the Week series*, as the month progresses. As always, we’d love to hear your recommendations on additional resources to share in the series. LGBTQ+ STEM DAY “LGBTQ+ people in science, technology,Read more about Resource of the Week: #SciComm & #PrideMonth[…]

#MySciComm: Kirsten Schwarz on Community-Based Research as SciComm

#MySciComm: Kirsten Schwarz on Community-Based Research as SciComm

This week, Kirsten Schwarz (the C&E Section incoming Chairperson) responds to the #MySciComm questions!

Woman smiling at camera
(Photo credit: Brittany Bays Photography)

Kirsten Schwarz is an urban ecologist studying environmental amenities and hazards in cities. Community engagement, social justice, and equity are central themes of her research. She has addressed community-level food insecurity and soil contamination in underserved neighborhoods of Sacramento, CA and the environmental drivers of soil lead patterns in Baltimore, MD.  Currently, Schwarz is leading a research team developing green infrastructure designs for vacant lots in partnership with community members, non-profits, city officials, and planners in Newport, KY. Schwarz earned her PhD in Ecology and Evolution from Rutgers University in 2010. She is currently a AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute Public Engagement Fellow. Kirsten is an Associate Professor of Environmental Science at Northern Kentucky University. She is also Director of Northern Kentucky University’s Ecological Stewardship Institute.

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Okay, Kirsten…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

Like many that find themselves in the environmental sciences I was a kid that loved nature and being outside.

Read more about #MySciComm: Kirsten Schwarz on Community-Based Research as SciComm

Resource of the Week: The importance of storytelling in science

Resource of the Week: The importance of storytelling in science

Numerous articles, resources, podcasts, and whole ventures (e.g., StoryCorps; The Moth) address key aspects of narrative and storytelling that are valuable (even essential) for sharing science. See the following articles for a few we find particularly helpful, insightful, or thought-provoking. These resources may change how you do things and/or provide you with useful citations toRead more about Resource of the Week: The importance of storytelling in science[…]

Resource of the Week: Truth in Science (Neither Absolute Nor Timeless)

Resource of the Week: Truth in Science (Neither Absolute Nor Timeless)

In this article from Aeon, Dr. Michela Massimi takes on the essential-yet-complex role of truth in science. Philosophical, thought-provoking, and essential reading. Lots to ponder in here about how truth gets portrayed, how perceptions of what is true change, notions of truth vs. consensus, and the implications of these nuances and fluidity for public trust inRead more about Resource of the Week: Truth in Science (Neither Absolute Nor Timeless)[…]

Resource of the Week: Visualization Tips for Small Data Sets/Sample Sizes

Resource of the Week: Visualization Tips for Small Data Sets/Sample Sizes

According to Tracey L. Weissgerber, Natasa M. Milic, Stacey J. Winham, and Vesna D. Garovic, proper representation of small data sets and sample sizes allows accurate interpretation. Doing so, they assert, requires displaying continuous data. But, they write, “Most papers presented continuous data in bar and line graphs. This is problematic, as many different data distributionsRead more about Resource of the Week: Visualization Tips for Small Data Sets/Sample Sizes[…]

#MySciComm: You’re gonna need a bigger online outreach strategy: How Dr. David Shiffman uses social media to teach the world about sharks

#MySciComm: You’re gonna need a bigger online outreach strategy: How Dr. David Shiffman uses social media to teach the world about sharks

This week, Dr. David Shiffman responds to the #MySciComm questions! 

*Editor’s note: David is available Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (the date of publication) to answer questions you may have about what it’s like to be a science communicator, how he got into it, and sharks, of course! Connect with him in the comments, or on Twitter and Facebook (use #MySciComm so he sees it).

Headshot of a man standing on a doc; several small sailboats are moored behind him.
David Shiffman in Miami, Florida, after a shark research trip during his PhD (Photo by Josh Liberman)

Dr. David Shiffman is a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Conservation Biology at Simon Fraser University, where he studies the conservation and management of sharks. He has been interviewed for over 200 mainstream media articles, and has bylines with the Washington Post, Scientific American, Slate, Gizmodo, and more. He is also an award-winning public educator who has used social media to answer thousands of people’s questions about sharks, and has taught over 500 scientists how to use social media to communicate their research to the public. Connect with him on twitter @WhySharksMatter and Facebook

The #MySciComm series features a host of SciComm professionals. We’re looking for more contributors, so please get in touch if you’d like to write a post!

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Okay, David…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

SHARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRK!

Read more about #MySciComm: You’re gonna need a bigger online outreach strategy: How Dr. David Shiffman uses social media to teach the world about sharks

#Sketchyourscience a hit at #ESA100…so what?

#Sketchyourscience a hit at #ESA100…so what?

At ESA’s annual conference/meeting (#ESA100) our section had a booth at which we encouraged folks to sketch their science.

We were blown away by how many people enthusiastically did so.

Read more about #Sketchyourscience a hit at #ESA100…so what?