Resource of the Week: What is most accessible, light text on dark background or vice versa?

Resource of the Week: What is most accessible, light text on dark background or vice versa?

Image: screenshot from the article

We’re stepping a little outside our standard one-link-a-week format for this one.

The TL;DR is that high contrast between background and text colors is important, and that for many users, black text on a white background is a) most legible and b) most professional-appearing. However, it’s complicated and user-dependent. Below are a few articles which delve further into the topic. Read more about Resource of the Week: What is most accessible, light text on dark background or vice versa?

Resource of the Week: Targeting messages for your conference audience

Resource of the Week: Targeting messages for your conference audience

Image: screenshot from the article Looking ahead to #ESA2018, we thought this resource might be handy! From the article: “…whether you have a town meeting, a public talk, or an upcoming event […] you still don’t have to default to the ‘general public!’ What do you know about the kind of audience the organizers are tryingRead more about Resource of the Week: Targeting messages for your conference audience[…]

Resource of the Week: When is science newsworthy?

Resource of the Week: When is science newsworthy?

The American Geophysical Union has a pile of great resources for interacting with the media. Two we’re highlighting today are focused on helping you discern whether the science story idea you have is newsworthy. These tips apply whether you are trying to get press coverage or wanting to write about your own science. Description onRead more about Resource of the Week: When is science newsworthy?[…]

Resource of the Week: Free, 5-episode online series for scientists writing blogs, op-eds, etc.

Resource of the Week: Free, 5-episode online series for scientists writing blogs, op-eds, etc.

Image: screenshot from the article Share Your Science: Resources for Blogging and Op-Eds for Magazines, Newspapers and More Scientific American and the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University have launched a free, 5-episode, online series aimed at helping scientists and engineers write blogs and op-eds for magazines, newspapers and other newsRead more about Resource of the Week: Free, 5-episode online series for scientists writing blogs, op-eds, etc.[…]

Resource of the Week: National Academies discussion of new report, “Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine”

Resource of the Week: National Academies discussion of new report, “Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine”

Image: screenshot from event announcement *Register ASAP if you are interested. There are limited spaces for both in-person and webcast.* From the National Academies’ event announcement: “Discussion and Response to the Report Tuesday, June 26, 2018 9:00 AM – 3:15 PM PT Irvine, CA How can academic institutions and other industries improve in the #MeToo era? Join us onRead more about Resource of the Week: National Academies discussion of new report, “Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine”[…]

Introducing the 2018-2019 C&E Chairperson-Elect

Introducing the 2018-2019 C&E Chairperson-Elect

The results are in, and Dr. Kirsten Schwarz will assume the chairperson-elect position after #ESA2018. Meet Kirsten: We are excited to keep up the Section momentum with Kirsten! She directs the Ecological Stewardship Institute at Northern Kentucky University. She is an urban ecologist who uses a transdisciplinary systems approach to understand how landscape patterns affectRead more about Introducing the 2018-2019 C&E Chairperson-Elect[…]

#MySciComm: Sara Kuebbing on transitioning from management to research and scicomm about invasive plants

#MySciComm: Sara Kuebbing on transitioning from management to research and scicomm about invasive plants

This week, Dr. Sara Kuebbing, of Plant Love Stories*, responds to the #MySciComm questions!

Sara tending her invasive plant seedlings during her dissertation research at the University of Tennessee (Photo by Katie Stuble)

Sara Kuebbing is a plant ecologist and conservation biologist who adores chickadees and mayapples. She is delighted to join the University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Biological Sciences this fall as an Assistant Professor. Sara’s most recent #MySciComm adventure is propagating Plant Love Stories, a website devoted to curating and collecting people’s stories about how plants have shaped their lives. Sara runs PLS with a team of other fantastic SciCommers. Connect with her @SaraKuebbbing or via her website.

The #MySciComm series features a host of SciComm professionals. We’re looking for more contributors, so please get in touch if you’d like to write a post!

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Okay, Sara…

1) How did you get into the kind of SciComm that you do?

#MySciComm activities started out with more Comm than Sci.

Read more about #MySciComm: Sara Kuebbing on transitioning from management to research and scicomm about invasive plants

Resource of the Week: “Lady Science” journal (resource & publishing opportunity)

Resource of the Week: “Lady Science” journal (resource & publishing opportunity)

Image: screenshot from the website Lady Science is an independent magazine that focuses on the history of women and gender in science, technology, and medicine, and provides an accessible and inclusive platform for writing about women on the web. The editors write, “In the spirit of the lady scientists of the past, as we workRead more about Resource of the Week: “Lady Science” journal (resource & publishing opportunity)[…]

Resource of the Week: Is there any evidence linking creativity and mood disorders

Resource of the Week: Is there any evidence linking creativity and mood disorders

Image: screenshot from the article “The Romantic stereotype that creativity is enhanced by a mood disorder is dangerous, and dissolves under careful scrutiny.” from @aeonmag As we’ve recently shared, stereotypes about who is or can be a scientist, who is or can be an artist, and how stereotypes of creativity play into these identities canRead more about Resource of the Week: Is there any evidence linking creativity and mood disorders[…]