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Ecology

Pika survival rates dry up with low moisture

In the Pacific Northwest, dry air interacts with low snow conditions to affect pika abundances at different elevations   February 4, 2019 For Immediate Release Contact: Zoe Gentes, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@setnegz   Although it has been ranked as the cutest creature in US National Parks, the American pika is tough, at home in loose alpine rocks in windswept mountain…

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Does mountaintop removal also remove rattlesnakes?

Mining operations in Appalachia permanently alter habitat availability for rattlesnakes   January 3, 2018 For Immediate Release Contact: Zoe Gentes, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@setnegz   On the Cumberland Plateau in eastern Kentucky, surface coal mining is destroying ridgelines and mountaintops, and along with them, the habitat of a surprisingly gentle reptile species – the timber rattlesnake. “Timber rattlesnakes may be…

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South American Marsupials Discovered to Reach New Heights

For the first time, scientists catch on camera a tiny marsupial climbing higher than previously thought in the forest canopy   October 18, 2018 For Immediate Release Contact: Zoe Gentes, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@setnegz   In the Andean forests along the border of Chile and Argentina, there have long been speculations that the mouse-sized marsupial monito del monte (Dromiciops gliroides)…

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Putting ecology back in school

Currently, U.S. students can graduate high school without taking a course that covers ecological science or that encourages ecological literacy—the ability to understand the interconnectedness of life on Earth. By not being exposed to this material, students’ career paths can be dramatically impacted. On a basic level, they may not consider the advantages of exploring ecology as an option for post-secondary education. But sometimes, they may never understand the complex dynamics of natural and built environments, including the role of humans in an ecosystem.

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