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climate change

Four gian tortises walk toward the camera with a second group following beind in the background.

Giant Tortoises Migrate Unpredictably in the Face of Climate Change

Unlike many migratory species, Galapagos giant tortoises do not use current environmental conditions to time their seasonal migration.

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Alaskan Carbon Assessment Has Implications For National Climate Policy

A special article collection in Ecological Applications looks into how the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases stored in forests, permafrost, lakes, and rivers interact   October 5, 2018 For Immediate Release Contact: Zoe Gentes, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@setnegz   Alaska’s land mass is equal to the size of one-fifth of the continental United States, yet stores about half of…

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Trees travelling west: how climate is changing our forests

103rd Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America:  Extreme events, ecosystem resilience and human well-being 5–10 August 2018 August 1, 2018 For Immediate Release Contact: Zoe Gentes, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@setnegz New Orleans on-site press room: 504-670-6402   Many studies on the impacts of global temperature rise have suggested that the range of trees will migrate poleward and upward….

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Mangroves to mudflats and not back again

103rd Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America:  Extreme events, ecosystem resilience and human well-being 5–10 August 2018 July 13, 2018 For Immediate Release Contact: Zoe Gentes, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@setnegz Over one-third of Earth’s population lives with 100 km of a coastline and depend on the services that coastal ecosystems provide. With the intensity and impact of hurricanes…

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Adorable alpine animal acclimates behavior to a changing climate

2017 Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world 6–11 August 2017   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, 1 August 2017 Contact: Liza Lester, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@retseLL   As climate change brings new pressures to bear on wildlife, species must “move, adapt, acclimate, or die.” Erik Beever and colleagues…

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U.S. Exit from the Paris Agreement Disregards Science and Endangers Global Environment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 2,  2017 Contact: Alison Mize, 703-625-3628, gro.asenull@nosila Liza Lester, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@retseLL   By withdrawing from the Paris Agreement on climate change, the United States is abdicating its role as the world leader in using science-based information to inform policy. Business, political, and scientific leaders the world over are condemning the decision. More than 190…

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Thirty-one top scientific societies speak with one voice on global climate change

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11:00 am EDT Tuesday, 28 June 2016Media Contacts: Ginger Pinholster, AAAS, 202-326-6421, gro.saaanull@slohnipg Joan Buhrman, AGU, 202-777-7509,  gro.uganull@namrhubj Kasey S. White, GSA, 202-669-0466, gro.yteicosoegnull@etihwk In a consensus letter to U.S. policymakers, a partnership of 31 leading nonpartisan scientific societies today reaffirmed the reality of human-caused climate change, noting that greenhouse gas emissions “must be substantially reduced” to…

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Ecological Society of America Responds to Pope Francis’ Encyclical, LAUDATO SI: ON CARE FOR OUR COMMON HOME

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, June 29, 2015 Contact: Liza Lester, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@retseLL The following statement is attributable to the Ecological Society of America (ESA), President-elect Monica G. Turner, PhD, President David W. Inouye, PhD and Immediate Past-president Jill S. Baron, PhD. ESA represents nearly 10,000 professional ecologists in the US. WASHINGTON, DC — “The Ecological Society of America…

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From the community: ESA annual meeting in the news

Last week at the Ecological Society of America’s (ESA) 95th Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh, scientists presented research on the foraging behavior of bushbabies, the effects of RoundUp herbicide on amphibians, the benefits of microbial communities inside the human body and the global issues surrounding invasive species, pollution, global warming, elevated nitrogen and hypoxia, among others. Here is just some of the research from ESA’s annual meeting.

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