Skip to main content

Not falling far from the tree: Ecologists study seed-to-seedling transition

By the National Science Foundation 3/4/2020 Why are there so many species of plants? Why do some plants thrive, while others don’t? Ecologist Noelle Beckman of Utah State University and her colleagues explore these questions in new findings about seed-to-seedling transitions published in the journal Ecology. The research is supported by the National Science Foundation. “This team used a new approach to analyzing spatial…

Read More

UCF Study: Sea Level Rise Impacts to Canaveral Sea Turtle Nests Will Be Substantial

By University of Central Florida  3/4/2020 Sea level rise and hurricanes are a threat to sea turtle nesting habitat along national seashores in the Southeast, but a new study predicts the greatest impact to turtles will be at Canaveral National Seashore. The University of Central Florida-led study, which was published recently in the journal Ecological Applications, examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests…

Read More

Flower faithful native bee makes a reliable pollinator

By University of California Riverside 3/4/2020 Entomologists at UC Riverside have documented that a species of native sweat bee widespread throughout North and South America has a daily routine that makes it a promising pollinator.  Because the bee can thrive in environments that have been highly modified by humans, such as cities and agricultural areas, it could become a suitable supplement…

Read More

Soil life thrives between oil palm fronds

By University of Gottingen 3/2/2020 The threat to insects and other small creatures from rainforest clearance and the consequences for the environment in tropical regions are recognised. What has not been studied so far is whether, and how, the oil palm plantations are able to sustain the populations of tiny below-ground animals that work to keep the soil healthy. In a…

Read More

Federally protected lands reduce habitat loss and protect endangered species, study finds

By Tufts University  3/2/2020 MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass. (March 2, 2020)— Using more than 30 years of earth satellite images, scientists at Tufts University and the non-profit conservation organization Defenders of Wildlife have discovered that habitat loss for imperiled species in the U.S. over this period was more than twice as great on non-protected private lands than on federally protected lands. As…

Read More

Not Falling Far from Tree: USU Ecologist Studies Seed-to-Seedling Transitions

By Utah State University 2/27/2020 Utah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman and colleagues Philippe Marchand of the University of Quebec, Liza Comita of Yale University, Joseph Wright of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, Richard Condit of Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History and internationally renowned ecologist Stephen P. Hubbell of the University of California, Los Angeles, explore these questions…

Read More

Researchers in Kruger National Park Observe How Fire and Drought Shape Plant Communities

By University Of California, Santa Barbara 2/27/2020 Deron Burkepile, a professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology has been working in southern Africa for longer than a decade, monitoring the complex and diverse plant communities which populate the region. Burkepile first began doing field work in Kruger National Park, South Africa about 15 years ago,…

Read More

Many species in mountains have to choose between higher temperatures or decreased oxygen levels

By University of Copenhagen 2/11/2020    As a result of global warming many species are currently shifting altitudinal distribution in mountain areas. Even though most move to higher altitudes, there are large differences among species, and some even shift downward to lower altitudes. A recently published paper in the acclaimed journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment from the Ecological…

Read More