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Assistant Professor Carl Boettiger named 2020 Ecological Society of America Fellow

By Rausser College of Natural Resources at The University of California, Berkeley 4/9/2020 Congratulations to environmental science, policy, and management assistant professor Carl Boettiger on being named one of the Ecological Society of America’s 2020 Early Career Fellows. The fellowship recognizes Boettiger for his contributions to the community at large through his research, teaching, and communication, as well as his leadership within stochastic dynamics…

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Four U-M faculty members named Ecological Society of America Fellows

By The University of Michigan 4/9/2020 ANN ARBOR—Four University of Michigan faculty members have been named as 2020 Fellows of the Ecological Society of America, the world’s largest community of professional ecologists. The society’s fellowship program recognizes the many ways its members contribute to ecological research and discovery, communication, teaching, and management and policy. The program recognizes both Fellows and…

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UVM Trio Named Ecological Society of America Fellows

By University of Vermont Gund Institute for Environment 4/8/2020 Three trailblazing University of Vermont professors were named Fellows of the Ecological Society of America (ESA) today for outstanding contributions to the science of ecology.  UVM’s trio of new ESA Fellows are: Aimée Classen and Taylor Ricketts (Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources), and Nicholas Gotelli (College of Arts and…

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Ecological Society of America announces 2020 Fellows

The Ecological Society of America (ESA) is pleased to announce its 2020 Fellows. The Society’s fellowship program recognizes the many ways in which its members contribute to ecological research and discovery, communication, education and pedagogy, and management and policy.

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Invasive species with charisma have it easier

By Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries 4/6/2020 More and more animals and plants are being taken from their habitat by humans – consciously and unconsciously. Many cannot adapt to the new living conditions, but some are becoming firmly established. “Some non-native species cause serious problems for native species – as predators, competitors for food and habitat, or vectors…

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There’s too much nitrogen and phosphorus in U.S. waterways

By Florida International University 3/31/2020 Even minor amounts of human activity can increase nutrient concentrations in fresh waters that can damage the environment, according to a new study. These findings suggest most U.S. streams and rivers have higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorus than is recommended. Although nutrients are a natural part of aquatic ecosystems like streams and rivers, too…

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Bargain-hunting for biodiversity: New tool pinpoints conservation targets

By National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis 3/16/2020 Conserving natural habitat around strawberry fields can help protect growers’ yields, their bottom line and the environment with no detectable threat to food safety, indicates a study led by the University of California, Davis. KNOXVILLE—The best bargains for conserving some of the world’s most vulnerable salamanders and other vertebrate species can…

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Method developed to protect threatened eelgrass meadows

By University of Gothenberg 3/13/2020 Researchers have used a new method to identify which eelgrass meadows on the Swedish coasts are particularly vulnerable or valuable and which meadows should be restored in the future. Eelgrass (Zostera marina) is a marine flowering plant that provides a habitat for a wide range of marine plants and animals, including several commercial fish, such as…

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Ocean acidification impacts oysters’ memory of environmental stress

By University of Washington 3/12/2020 As oceans absorb more carbon dioxide, they are becoming increasingly acidic and shifting the delicate balance that supports marine life. How species will cope with ocean acidification and the other consequences of global climate change is still very much unknown and could have sweeping consequences. Researchers from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery…

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Natural Habitat Around Farms a Win for Strawberry Growers, Birds and Consumers

By University of California, Davis 3/11/2020 Conserving natural habitat around strawberry fields can help protect growers’ yields, their bottom line and the environment with no detectable threat to food safety, indicates a study led by the University of California, Davis. In the study, published in the journal Ecological Applications, researchers conducted grower surveys and experiments at 20 strawberry farms stretching between Santa Cruz, Watsonville,…

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Climate change at Mount Rainier expected to increase ‘mismatch’ between visitors and iconic wildflowers

By University of Washington 3/9/2020 Spring is coming, and with it comes the promise of warmer weather, longer days and renewed life. For residents of the Pacific Northwest, one of the most idyllic scenes of this renewed life is the wildflowers that light up Mount Rainier’s subalpine meadows once the winter snowpack finally melts. These floral ecosystems, which typically arrive…

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University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa study suggests how to save threatened Haleakalā silverswords

By University of Hawai’i, Manoa 3/5/2020 The Haleakalā silversword, already one of the rarest species in the Hawaiian Islands, has been declining in recent decades due to drier and warmer climate conditions. Efforts to restore the population should focus on outplanting new plants in geographic areas with the most favorable climatic conditions. That’s according to a three-year study by researchers from…

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