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Press Releases — Page 7

Monitoring biodiversity with sound: how machines can enrich our knowledge

By University of Göttingen 6/18/2019 For a long time, ecologists have relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now the better option for logging animal vocalisations. Scientists lead by the University of Göttingen have investigated this using studies of birds as an example. The results were…

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Scientists identify plant that flowers in Brazilian savanna one day after fire

By São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) 5/15/2019 Plants in the Brazilian savanna, the Cerrado, have evolved to deal with fire. When fire is used intelligently as part of a carefully planned land management method, it is indispensable to the conservation of this superb ecosystem, the world’s most biodiverse savanna. Two months suffice for the Cerrado to burst into flower after…

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Western Lowland Gorillas: The choice of socio-sexual partners

By University of Rennes, Earth Sciences and Astronomy Observatory (OSUR) 6/12/2019 Demographic and health factors that condition female dispersal decisions. In an article entitled “Disease avoidance, and breeding group size and dispersal patterns of western lowland gorilla females” published in the journal Ecology in June 2019, Alice Baudouin, Pascaline Gouar, Jean-Sebastien Pierre and Nelly Ménard (ECOBIO) explore the mechanisms of social dispersal…

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A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate

By University of Illinois 6/18/2019 If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. This could draw down aquifers, disrupt streams and rivers, and set up conflicts between agricultural and other human and ecological needs for water,…

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Six different ‘colour morphs’ of the Asiatic golden cat discovered in India’s Arunachal Pradesh

By Zoological Society of London 6/12/19 Six different colour morphs of the elusive Asiatic golden cat have been discovered in Northeast India – with the findings being hailed as “an evolutionary puzzle” – as the world’s greatest number of different coloured wild cat species in one area are reported. The Indian scientists from ZSL and UCL discovered the colour morphs, during…

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Secondhand horror: Indirect predator odor triggers reproductive changes in bank voles

By University of Jyväskylä 6/10/2019 Reproducing in a fearful world is tricky. How do rodents get information of prevailing risk of death, and how do they respond to the information? A research team of evolutionary biologists from University of Jyväskylä, Finland and University of Vienna, Austria reported that rodent mothers are more likely to become pregnant after smelling odors produced…

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University of Guelph Researchers Discover Meat-Eating Plant in Ontario

By University of Guelph 6/7/2019 Call it the “Little Bog of Horrors.” In what is believed to be a first for North America, biologists at the University of Guelph have discovered that meat-eating pitcher plants in Ontario’s Algonquin Park wetlands consume not just bugs but also young salamanders. In a paper published this week in the journal Ecology, the research…

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Analysis: World’s Protected Areas Safeguard Only a Fraction of Wildlife

By Wildlife Conservation Society 6/5/2019 A new analysis published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment shows that the world’s protected areas (PAs) are experiencing major shortfalls in staffing and resources and are therefore failing on a massive scale to safeguard wildlife. The analysis looked at more than 2,100 protected areas around the world and found that less than a…

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An island haven for frogs

By Macquarie University 6/4/2019 New Guinea is one of the only places in the world where frogs are safe from the species-destroying chytrid fungus. An international team of scientists has published a new paper that shows how to keep it that way, but they need help to carry out their plan. The chytrid fungus has wiped out more than 90…

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Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment

By Florida State University 6/3/2019 Every beachgoer can spot seaweed in the ocean or piling up on the beach, but Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Their work is published in the journal Ecological Monographs by the Ecological Society…

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