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Press Releases — Page 2

Study: Winter oil & gas surveys in Arctic Refuge leave lasting scars

By Woods Hole Research Center 6/10/2020 Vehicles and equipment used in winter-time seismic surveys for oil and gas drilling can leave long-lasting scars in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, raising questions about whether existing regulations are sufficient to protect the Refuge and the indigenous communities that rely on its wildlife, according to new research published in the journal Ecological Applications. Despite requirements that…

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Proposed seismic surveys in Arctic Refuge likely to cause lasting damage

by University of Alaska Fairbanks 6/9/2020 Winter vehicle travel can cause long-lasting damage to the tundra, according to a new paper by University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers published in the journal Ecological Applications. Scars from seismic surveys for oil and gas exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge remained for decades, according to the study. The findings counter assertions made…

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Roadkill study identifies animals most at risk in Europe

by University of Reading 6/11/20 Around 194 million birds and 29 million mammals are thought to be killed each year on European roads, according to a new study that has ranked the most vulnerable species. An international research team used 90 roadkill surveys from 24 European countries to create a new method of estimating both the birds and mammal species…

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Roads threaten millions of birds and mammals in Europe

By Universidade de Aveiro 6/9/2020 Approximately 194 million birds and 29 million mammals are struck by vehicles each year on European roads, according to estimates by an international team of researchers led by Clara Grilo, from the Center for Environmental and Sea Studies (CESAM) and the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon. The study was conducted at a…

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Nature’s ‘slow lanes’ offer hope for species feeling heat of climate change, other pressures

By Oregon State University 6/7/2020 CORVALLIS, Ore. – Pockets of landscape less prone than adjacent areas to disturbances like fire and drought may hold the key for scientists, conservationists and land managers seeking to preserve vulnerable species in a changing climate. These areas, categorized as “disturbance refugia,” are becoming a focal point for ecologists trying to learn why change doesn’t…

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Study tracks decades of life cycle changes in nonwoody plants

By University of Illinois 6/9/2020 CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — For 25 years, Carol Augspurger visited a patch of ancient woods near Urbana to look at the same 25 one-square-meter plots of earth she first demarcated for study in 1993. She surveyed the plots once a week in spring and summer, tracking the major life events of each of the herbaceous plants…

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Experts advocate fire management to conserve seasonally dry forests

By University of New Mexico 6/8/2020 Fire has been a central component in California’s natural and human history for millennia. Native Americans’ use of cultural burns in landscape management, in addition to lightning-ignited fires that burned unhindered, impacted most of the state’s ecosystems. However, in the late 1800s, California’s landscape underwent an era of Euro-American fire exclusion and suppression. As…

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