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External Press Releases — Page 33

A yellow flower blooms alone on barren soil. The yellow head web.

UW Research Provides Insight on Survivability of Rare Wyoming Plant

By University of Wyoming 3/5/2019 A rare plant found only at two sites in central Wyoming has persisted, in part, because it can recover from relatively low densities and grows at different rates within each location, according to new research led by a University of Wyoming scientist. The desert yellowhead, which grows on fewer than 55 acres in the Beaver…

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Alien species are primary cause of recent global extinctions

By University College London 3/4/2019 Alien species are the main driver of recent extinctions in both animals and plants, according to a new study by UCL researchers. They found that since 1500, alien species have been solely responsible for 126 extinctions, 13% of the total number studied. Of 953 global extinctions, 300 happened in some part because of alien species,…

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More humans always mean fewer African carnivores, right? Nope

By Michigan State University 3/1/2019 African carnivores face numerous threats from humans. So, it’s a fair assumption that the presence of more humans automatically equates to decreases across the board for carnivores. New research led by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Ecological Applications, however, shows that’s not always the case. The truth is some species…

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Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles

By University of Göttingen 2/19/2019 Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia. Various theories circulate about the actual cause of these unusual spatial patterns, ranging from poisonous Euphorbia plants or rising gases, to ants, termites or…

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Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada

By Point Blue Conservation Science 2/21/2019 How wildlife respond to climate change is likely to be complex. To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, new research published today from Point Blue Conservation Science examines the impacts to birds from a recent extreme drought (2013-2016). The drought resulted in the widespread…

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Tokita Receives Graduate Student Policy Award from Ecological Society of America

By Princeton University 2/20/2019 Tokita, a graduate student in ecology and evolutionary biology (EEB), is partially funded by a fellowship from the National Science Foundation. He works with Corina Tarnita, an associate professor in EEB, to create computational models for how social groups — including ants and humans — develop properties like division of labor and social networks. Read more here: https://www.princeton.edu/news/2019/02/20/tokita-receives-graduate-student-policy-award-ecological-society-america

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Grad student Sara Gonzalez wins policy award from Ecological Society of America

By UC Santa Cruz 2/13/2019 Sara Gonzalez, a Ph.D. student in ecology and evolutionary biology at UC Santa Cruz, is among the recipients of the Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Awards from the Ecological Society of America (ESA). This award provides graduate students with the opportunity to receive policy and communication training in Washington, D.C., and meet with lawmakers….

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Hurricanes in 2017 did not greatly damage corals, but reefs were already in trouble

By National Science Foundation 2/6/2019 Scientists find that decades of degradation created ‘resistant’ coral reefs Marine biologist Peter Edmunds was prepared for the worst. Back-to-back Category 5 hurricanes had torn through the Caribbean in September 2017. The scientist and his colleagues weren’t sure what they’d find when they visited fragile coral reefs near the island of St. John after the…

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Northeast-Atlantic fish stocks: Recovery driven by improved management

By THÜNEN INSTITUTE 2/4/2019 Sustainable exploitation of wild fish is possible, but only when fisheries policies are implemented that ensure precautionary catch regulations Due to overcapacities in fishing fleets and insufficiently regulated catches, many fish stocks in the Northeast-Atlantic had reached very low levels by the end of the 20th century. However, an increasing number of stocks has shown signs…

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OU Study Finds Insects Crave Salt and Search Grasslands for the Limiting Nutrient

By The University of Oklahoma 2/6/2019 An OU team from the Geographical Ecology Group conducted 54 experiments in both grazed and ungrazed grasslands to determine the salt cravings of insects and the types of insects that crave salt. NORMAN–A University of Oklahoma team from the Geographical Ecology Group has published a new study in the journal Ecology on the nutritional preferences of…

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