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Alison Mize — Page 3

Author Suzanne Alonzo observes spawning sixbar wrasse (Thalassoma hardwicke) off Moorea Island in French Polynesia (17°30′ S, 149°50′ W), 17 kilometers (11 miles) northwest of Tahiti. Credit, Jeffrey Shima.

Born under an inauspicious moon, baby fish delay settlement on coral reefs

Dark nights offer best chance of survival for sixbar wrasse leaving the open ocean for the reef, but risky moonlit swims may grant a fitness edge to survivors Monday, 18 December 2017 For Immediate Release Contact: Liza Lester, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@retseLL Parents’ choices about when to breed have lifelong consequences for offspring. For the sixbar wrasse, the flexibility of…

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Life of an albatross: tackling individuality in studies of populations

A study published in Ecological Monographs follows 9,685 wandering albatrosses throughout their long lives, seeking the intrinsic differences that make some individuals outstanding performers Thursday, 7 December 2017 For Immediate Release Contact: Liza Lester, 202-833-8773 ext. 211, gro.asenull@retseLL When ecologists study populations of animals, they commonly round off the individuality of individuals, treating animals of the same species, sex, and…

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A wild turkey peers through rain in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, 6 Nov 2017. Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS

Return of the native wild turkey—setting sustainable harvest targets when information is limited

The recovery of the wild turkey is a great restoration success story. But concerns have been rising over the specter of declines in some areas. Lack of reliable tools to estimate abundance of turkeys has increased uncertainty for managers. So wildlife researchers at Michigan State University investigated how to harvest wild turkeys sustainably when information is imperfect in a study published this fall in the Ecological Society of America’s journal Ecological Applications.

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