ESA Student Section Officers

Kika Tarsi (U. of Colorado, Boulder)

Chair of the Student Section

ROLE: As the Chair of the Student Section, I help organize professional development events for the annual ESA meeting (social mixers, workshops, symposia) as well as cultivate long-term funding strategies, such as greater membership and grant support.

ABOUT ME & SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS:

I am a PhD student in the Davies Lab in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. My research explores the mechanisms behind the curious and often unexpected responses of populations to habitat fragmentation. Much of this work focuses on fragmentation-driven changes in the thermal environment and its influence on species’ body size, distribution and population demographics. I am using a common garden skink as a focal species within the Wog Wog fragmentation experiment, but my work expands to the entire ecosystem in which they are a part. Wog Wog is a large scale, long-term forest fragmentation experiment in southeastern Australia, which was established by CSIRO scientists in 1985.

CONTACT INFO: jdtarsi@gmail.com

WEBSITE: www.kikatarsi.com

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Kate Gallagher (U. of California, Irvine)

Co-Vice Chair & Public Affairs Committee Rep

Role: As the Co-Vice-Chair, I am training to serve as the Co-Chair of the Student Section next year. I work with all of the officers to help fundraise, coordinate endorsed symposia, organize social and educational events, and grow Student Section membership.

ABOUT ME & SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS:

I am a PhD student in the Campbell Lab in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Irvine. My research interests are in community and population ecology, with an emphasis on examining plant-pollinator interactions within the context of global climate change. For my dissertation research I am examining the extent which floral rewards, pollination, and seed set of the tall-fringed bluebell, Mertensia ciliata (Boraginaceae), respond to experimental manipulations of water and flowering phenology. I primarily conduct my field research at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, CO. In 2011, I earned my MS in Plant Biology and Conservation from Northwestern University and the Chicago Botanic Garden. For my masters project, I investigated the extent to which seed source influences germination and performance of dominant grasses in prairie restorations.

CONTACT INFO: megankgallagher@gmail.com

WEBSITE: http://sites.uci.edu/mkgallagher/

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Dane C. Ward (Drexel University)

Co-Vice Chair

ROLE:As Co-Vice Chair for the ESA Student Section (ESA SS) I work collaboratively with the SS officers to facilitate student engagement, communication, and retention. We create student specific conference events, generate social media content, and organize travel awards to assist students in attending the annual conference.

ABOUT ME & SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS:

As a current Ph.D. candidate of the Bien Lab in the Department of Biodiversity, Earth, and Environmental Science (BEES) I am conducting research on the [Northern Pinesnake (Pituophis melanoleucus) in New Jersey](http://newsblog.drexel.edu/2013/08/02/why-cant-the-snakes-cross-the-road...). My investigations focus on the population ecology and genetics of this threatened species and its conservation. My research interests are broadly focused but center in conservation biology. My previous research includes studies of the Red-bellied Turtle (Pseudemys rubriventris), Lepidoptera of the Pine Barrens of New Jersey, and the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca_) in Chengdu China. I am very much interested in science education and finding new and novel methods for engaging students of all levels in science.

CONTACT INFO: dcw33@drexel.edu

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Nicole Boone (South Dakota State University)

Secretary

ROLE: My role as the student section secretary is to organize and coordinate ESA Student Section activities and members. I will also be working with other members to coordinate activities and help with preparation of activities at the annual meetings.

ABOUT ME & SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS:

I am currently a senior at South Dakota State University finishing up my degree in Ecology and Environmental Science with a minor in GIS. I enjoy the outdoors and love summer and am working on getting my scuba open water certification. I am the secretary of the SDSU Ecology Club. My scientific interest includes working with wetlands and creating maps that allow users to be aware of the changing environment. I also love to work with children to encourage them to interact and learn about the world around them through basic science concepts. My current research project includes working with the bud bank of smooth brome and effects of various treatments.

CONTACT INFO: ncboone@jacks.sdstate.edu

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Joshua Scholl (University of Arizona)

Treasurer

ROLE: I manage our section’s budget and work with the other executive officers in planning section events for the annual meeting. Additionally, I strive to grow our section both in membership and improvements through valuable discussion with the greater student body.

ABOUT ME & MY SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS:

My general research interests lie in population ecology and plant reproductive ecology which I pursue as a masters student at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Currently my main research goal is to summarize the occurrence of seed heteromorphism in southwestern deserts of North America as well as investigate its ecology and evolution. Seed heteromorphism is a reproductive strategy in which plants simultaneously produce multiple morphologically distinct seeds with unique ecological roles. It is hypothesized that by producing two seed types a plant is able to reduce fitness variance thereby increasing geometric mean fitness at the cost of arithmetic mean fitness. I earned my undergraduate degree in biological science at Florida Atlantic University in 2013. My thesis focused on understanding the population dynamics of gopher tortoises in southern Florida.

CONTACT INFO: scholl@email.arizona.edu

 

PAST OFFICERS

Past chairs : Elizabeth Harp (Colorado State University alum), Abe Miller-Rushing (The Wildlife Society & USA National Phenology Network), Roberto Salguero-Gomez (UPenn), Jenny M. Talbot (UC Irvine), Matthew D. Whiteside (UC Irvine), Naupaka Zimmerman (Stanford University), Jorge Ramos (Arizona State)

Testimonies from past officers: Inspirational stories from past officers of the ESA Student Section