Education Share Fair

View the Conference Schedule at a Glance here

What is the Education Share Fair Roundtable?

The Education Share Fair will be a central event of the Life Discovery – Doing Science Education conference!

We know there is a lot of wisdom among our participants!!  The Education Share Fair is designed for educators to share teaching ideas and resources at any stage of development to receive peer feedback.

Participants will have the opportunity to  provide peer feedback on fresh, preliminary ideas  or discover extensions on successful, developed ones.  Presentations may highlight ideas for lessons and curriculum design, modern technologies and new applications of traditional techniques; creative tools or classroom space design!  Discussions can cover issues related but not restricted to core concepts, teaching methodology, misconceptions, assessments or educational extensions.

Each presentation will be at a roundtable with up to 7-9 other participants.    All presenters are strongly encouraged to incorporate feedback and publish teaching ideas and classroom-ready scientific resources such as photo collections, figures and charts, case studies, simulations, and datasets  etc.  in the LifeDiscoveryEd Digital Library as a record of conference proceedings. Submissions will be peer-reviewed.

Roundtable Discussion Descriptions

Friday October 3, 2014

11:00 am

 

Table #A1

Popular Literature and Biology: What’s the Connection?

Chung Khong, Yerba Buena High School

Topic: Hands On/Minds Engaged

Other Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Competencies: Ecosystems – Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems; Ecosystems — Biodiversity and Humans

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Description: The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the use of two novels in teaching specific content in biology namely: “Never Cry Wolf” by Farley Mowat in Ecology and “Hot Zone” in the Cell. Participlants will learn the following: how to fit the use of novels in these two units, the assignments that comes with the use of the novels closely aligned with Common Core Reading and Writing Standards and Next Generation Science Standards, assessments associated with these novels, and ideas on cross-curricular collaboration.

Table #A2

Thumbs Up! for Evolution: A Differentiated Lesson for Experiential Learning

Allison Walker, High Point University

Topic: Dynamic Teaching/Active Learning

Other Topic: Evolution in Action

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Concepts: Ecosystems -Social Interactions and Group Behavior; Evolution; Ecosystems –Adaption; Ecosystems -Natural Selection Heredity; Heredity – Inheritance of Traits; Heredity – Variation of Traits; Structures and Processes; Structures and Processes – Growth and Development of Organisms; Structures and Processes – Structure and Function

Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data; Asking questions for science; Constructing explanations for science; Developing and using models; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information; Planning and carrying out investigations; Using mathematics and computational thinking

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Evolution, Structure and Function, Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science, Communicate and Collaborate with other disciplines, Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science, Understand the relationship between Science and Society, Use modeling and simulation, Use quantitative reasoning

Description: How does evolution influence our daily lives? This differentiated lesson plan includes hands-on evolutionary research, self-discovery, and culminates in a capstone project that highlights the significant biological and/or cultural adaptations of human history. Instead of telling students about our evolutionary history, SHOW them through self-experimentation, and let them discover how much we rely on integral, but often overlooked, adaptations in our daily lives.  The learning outcomes of this project include: scientific literacy, collaboration and creative problem-solving, personal and public resonance, and critical thinking to produce a STEAM-driven artistic product that translates scientific findings into an accessible art form that appeals to the general public.  The methodology varies by student level, but all address the essential question: could you survive without an essential adaptation? At the elementary level, students explore the significance of our opposable thumbs by attempting daily tasks like buttoning a shirt, writing or texting, making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, and many others, with thumbs duct-taped to their palms. By dividing the class into two groups and timing these tasks, students learn the basics of the scientific method by proposing a hypothesis, testing it with a control and experimental group, and charting the results in a graph. Once all have had a chance to participate in the data collection, they are then asked to reflect on the experience by answering sentence stems that can then be collected into a group poem. At the lower division undergraduate level, the experiment encompasses a full 48 hours without a chosen cultural or biological adaptation. Some examples include: hearing, eyesight, wheels, fire, music, eating utensils, money, language (written), language (oral), shoes, technology, cooperation, and molars. In small groups, students first observe the university campus population and reflect on the ways in which their chosen adaptation influences survival behaviors and social interactions. They then spend 48 hours without that adaptation, but otherwise engaging in their daily activities. Once all members have completed their 48 hours of self-experimentation, they collaborate on a reflective artistic rendering of their findings with a scholarly introduction that places the piece in an academic context.  Here’s an example from a first year undergraduate seminar class. The students chose to give up their thumbs for 48 hours (duct tape kept them honest), and produced this ironic and satirical hip hop video to illustrate their findings: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BJ3eKIYOS4  Materials likewise vary by student level and choice, but the learning outcomes can be reached in a surprisingly low-tech and cost-effective manner.  The only requirement is a roll of duct tape and a sense of humor!

 

Table #A3

Modeling Populations: Emphasizing the Importance of Mathematical Modeling in Undergraduate Ecology

Kristin McCully, University of California, Santa Cruz

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/ Active Learning, Hands On/ Minds Engaged, Assess Learning/ Adapt Teaching

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics

Intended Audience: Undergraduate: Upper Division

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science; Understand the relationship between Science and Society; Use modeling and simulation; Use quantitative reasoning

Description: Both the biology research and education communities suggest that most undergraduate biology curricula do not provide students adequate training in the quantitative skills they need to obtain a deep understanding of biological phenomena and to contribute effectively to future scientific inquiry.  To help address those needs, we present a computer inquiry module using ecology research literature to introduce structured population (matrix) models, one of the most commonly-used types of ecological models. Our teaching model starts with an interactive lecture introducing the concepts and mechanics of structured population models; students read published research papers that apply structured population models to specific populations and conservation questions, work through the specific models in groups on computers using the Microsoft Excel add-on PopTools, and present the model with their own research question to the class.  The lesson plan and accompanying materials are available at: http://tiny.cc/ecolmodelsmodule. We found that, in an upper-division ecology course at a research university, students demonstrated that they accomplished the objectives of the module to be able to use matrix models to project how management actions may impact a population and to understand why models are important in ecology and wildlife management. In pre-module and post-module surveys, a final exam, and interviews, students showed significant increases in structured population modeling skills, such as interpreting transition matrices and population projection graphs, and were able to identify life stages and vital rates on which managers should focus resources.  Although very few students said they liked math and enjoyed coursework that includes math, most students recognized how important mathematics is to ecology and conservation biology and commented that they enjoyed this module because they chose the organism to study, analyzed the model themselves using a computer program, and developed their own research question.

 

Table #A4

Authentic Undergraduate Research Experiences in Introductory STEM courses

James Hewlett, Community College Undergraduate Research Initiative, Heather Bock, Finger Lakes Community College

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/ Active Learning

Topic: Undergraduate Research

Intended Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Evolution; Information flow, exchange, and storage; Pathways and transformations of energy and matter; Structure and Function; Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science; Communicate and Collaborate with other disciplines; Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Understand the relationship between Science and Society; Use modeling and simulation; Use quantitative reasoning

Description: The purpose of this Share Fair Roundtable Discussion is to provide opportunities for faculty to share pedagogical models and curricula designed to facilitate the integration of an undergraduate research experience into traditional introductory STEM courses.  The Roundtable will be led by faculty from the Community College Undergraduate Research Initiative www.ccuri.org.  CCURI’s mission is to help community colleges develop undergraduate research programs as part of their curriculum reform efforts.  CCURI representatives will draw upon examples from the CCURI partner portfolio to highlight ways that undergraduate research has been integrated into courses. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of how introductory STEM courses can be created or reformed to incorporate a research experience.  The session will focus on various barriers faculty have (and will) face in their reform efforts, along with ways to ensure sustainability of those reforms.

Table #A5

Promoting University Attendance by Underrepresented Groups with Multi-year Mentoring: the CiM-Bio Model

Zachary Culumber, Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas de las Huastecas Aguazarca

Conference Track: Hands On/Minds Engaged

Topic: Evolution in Action

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Concepts: Ecosystems – Adaption; Ecosystems – Biodiversity and Humans; Ecosystems – Natural Selection; Heredity – Inheritance of Traits; Heredity – Variation of Traits; Structures and Processes – Structure and Function

Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data; Asking questions for science; Constructing explanations for science; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information; Planning and carrying out investigations

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Description: The CiM-Bio program was designed as a mechanism to supplement local science education in rural Mexico and to support life science education in an effort to promote university attendance and achievement by underrepresented groups.  Beginning at the junior high level, students can gain experience in the life sciences through mentoring by graduate students, postdocs and professors in structured scientific projects.  These one-on-one interactions with trained scientists are designed to build critical thinking abilities and support development of skills important for success and achievement in scientific tracks at the university and careers levels.  http://www.cichaz.org/outreach/cim-bio/

 

Table #A6

Engaging the Non-major through Collaborative Science

Annissa Furr, Kaplan University

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/ Active Learning

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics

Intended Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Information flow, exchange, and storage

Competencies: Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Understand the relationship between Science and Society

Description: The Science Department in the School of General Education at Kaplan University offers science courses to students from very diverse backgrounds. Many of our students are non-science majors, and we have made it our goal to engage them in activities and assignments that would connect their everyday lives to science in an effort to show them that science is all around them. To do this, we have created assignments that allow them to use their personal experiences and surroundings. For example, one assignment asks students to calculate their individual carbon footprint, and then determine changes in their lifestyle that they would be willing to make to reduce their carbon footprint in real life. We have had great success with this and other assignments using this approach, and have found that students are able to make solid connections between science and their everyday lives. We hope to continue building on this assignment by taking the results and compiling the data to create a citizen science approach to collaborative science. It is necessary to design ways in which to combine the data from individual students into a collaborative format we can share across different sections of the course. We believe that this will help the students feel more vested and generate a greater sense of involvement with other students – allowing them an opportunity to see their own individual work as part of a larger project. Participants of this roundtable will gain additional knowledge that can be incorporated into their own classrooms, and will generate a robust discussion of collaborative approaches to engage non-major students in their classrooms.

Calculating Carbon Footprint: http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/individual.html

Designing hypothesis: http://www.carbonrally.com/challenges

 

Table #A7

Thinking Like a Neuroscientist: Using Scaffolded Grant Proposals in a Freshman Neuroscience Course

Stacey Taylor, Stanford University;Hania Koever, Stanford University; Melinda Owens, Stanford University; Andrew Dosmann, Stanford

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/ Active Learning, Assess Learning/Adapt Teaching

Topic: Structure and Function

Other Topic: Neuroscience

Intended Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Structure and Function; Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science; Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Use quantitative reasoning

Description: We designed a set of teaching activities called, “Thinking Like a Neuroscientist” to help transform a relatively content-based introductory neuroscience course for freshmen into one that also develops scientific reasoning and communication skills. Our learning goals included the ability to formulate scientific questions, develop systematic approaches to answer those questions, demonstrate analytical and scientific reasoning, and communicate effectively in written form.   The “Thinking like a Neuroscientist” activities are centered around three small grant proposals that the students wrote throughout the term. The assignment prompt for each grant proposal is  integrated with material from lecture, so over the three grant proposal cycles, students practiced applying the same skills to new material. We scaffolded students’ ability to create effective proposals through section discussion, brainstorming worksheets, and oral and written feedback.  Students are rarely asked to do grant proposal assignments in introductory science courses. Therefore, to assess whether the assignments furthered students’ progress towards our learning goals, we compared their performance on experimental design exercises completed at the beginning and end of the course. We also constructed a survey to determine students’ perceptions of the activities and assessment of their own learning gains. In holding a roundtable for  “Thinking Like a Neuroscientist,” we hope to receive feedback for future implementation and assessment in our own course as well as discuss adapting the framework to other science courses.  The activities involve developing both disciplinary expertise and broadly applicable critical thinking skills, making the teaching method potentially useful for a range of courses.

 

 Table #A8

Modeling Activities in Support of NGSS Strategies

Jim Clark, Arroyo High School

Conference Track: Hands On/ Minds Engaged

Topic: Evolution in Action, Structure and Function

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Concepts: Evolution; Heredity; Heredity – Variation of Traits; Structures and Processes; Structures and Processes – Growth and Development of Organisms; Structures and Processes – Information Processing; Structures and Processes – Structure and Function

Competencies: Asking questions for science; Constructing explanations for science; Developing and using models; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Description: At this time we are developing units around genetics and evolution.  The goal is to provide students with high cognitive tasks that have multiple access points that will challenge and stretch their notions of mutations and their role in evolution.   Participants will come to understand how these types of lessons are developed and will have the opportunity to provide feedback on new lessons.

 

 Table # A9

Creating Relevance in Botany through Cultural Connections

Laura Smith, Frostburg State University

Table #10

Conference Track: Assess Learning/Adapt Teaching

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics

Intended Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Understand the relationship between Science and Society

Description: Students often enter biology courses with limited known connections to the natural world and with even fewer connections to plants.  Botany and plant taxonomy courses have traditionally focused on memorization of disconnected physiological and morphological terminology.  Often this focus on individual species and their biological traits fails to exhibit the important connections that exist between students and plants. Implementation of a few novel techniques engages students by developing an understanding plants’ relevance to their own lives as well as their connections to other living things.  Biology is conducted in a societal context” (Brewer et al., 2011). We implement matrix assessments for species being identified in the field in order to bring together biological and social roles of plants.  The activity learning objectives are to compare known species and efficiently differentiate them using specific characters and correct terminology (evaluation, analysis). The added social aspect of this exercise is to incorporate cultural uses, historical information, and sensory connections to a visual matrix to allow students to see the relationships between individual plants and plant families and their cultural context. Our matrix incorporates stories from the past with traits of the plant, including their potential material, medicinal, and culinary uses. Matrices could also incorporate host plant relationships in the food web and other ecological relationships, as would align with the Vision and Change core concept goal for students to achieve a basic understanding of the interconnected nature of living systems.

 


 

 

11:45 am

Table #B1

Pollen and Public Health: A Citizen Science Project

Tiffany Carey, University of Michigan

Conference Track: Hands On/Minds Engaged

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Concepts: Ecosystems – Ecosystem Dynamics;  Functioning and Resilience

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Description: To introduce urban high school students to ecology, we engaged them in research on a topic relevant to their lives. To ascertain if allergenic plant densities are correlated with certain land uses, students collected pollen with a homemade pollen collector based on the Durham’s gravitational sampler. Students placed their pollen collectors in their designated land use area( i.e. residential, parks or vacant lots). As a post assessment evaluation, students were given a survey to quantify the impacts of this project on students’ attitudes toward science. We also supplemented our pollen collection project with  other educational outreach activities, including: in-school presentations with project background and methods and field trips to the University of Michigan and Belle Isle Nature Park.

 

Table #B2

How interactive is your Classroom?  Collecting Data Using the Student Participation Observation Tool (SPOT)

Katrina Roseler, San Jose State University

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/Active Learning, Hands On/Minds Engaged, Assess Learning/Adapt Teaching

Topic: Applicable to all topic areas.

Intended Audience: Educators at all levels

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Description: Current educational research shows that students achieve higher learning gains in science classrooms when interactive techniques are used. However, traditional lecture has been used for so long, it’s difficult for educators to move away from this model. Do you wonder how interactive your classroom is? Would you like to compare the interactivity in your classroom to that of others? Education researchers at San Jose State University have developed a computer interface called the Student Participation Observation Tool (SPOT: http://sjsuspot.appspot.com/) that allows an observer to categorize and catalog the types of interactions instructors engage in with students in a classroom. The data collected using the SPOT can be used for research or your own professional development. Attend this workshop to learn how SPOT works, what it’s told us so far, and how you can use it to give and receive better peer feedback from classroom observations. Bring a laptop or tablet if possible.

 

Table #B3

Real-time Construction and Implementation of Formative Assessment Using Clickers

Andrew Martin, University of Colorado

Topic: Dynamic Teaching/Active Learning, Assess Learning/Adapt Teaching

Other Topic: Evolution in Action

Other Audience: Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Competencies: Evolution

Description: Students in biology (and other STEM disciplines) often make predictions using graphs or construct simple predictive models. Often the graphs and models are constructed with pen and paper, or increasingly using the computer, but it is often difficult to visualize student thinking (their graphs or models) and summarize the variation in student thinking. With aid of clickers, it is possible to construct clicker questions based on student work done during class, use the question to summarize the distribution of their predictions and models, and then use the resulting histogram as the basis for having students justify their perspective. This approach is best illustrated with examples of student work and having the audience at this meeting participate in a manner  that lends itself to demonstrating the ease and effectiveness of this approach. This method enable visualization of student thinking, provides immediate feedback to students, and creates opportunities for learner-centric practice of critical thinking skills.

 

Table #B4

Bugs and Botany:  A Play-based Approach to Bridging Science and Society

Lauren Hull, Frostburg State University

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/Active Learning

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Concepts: Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Cycles of Matter and Energy Transfer in Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Ecosystem Dynamics; Functioning and Resilience; Ecosystems – Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Social Interactions and Group Behavior; Ecosystems – Adaption; Ecosystems – Biodiversity and Humans

Competencies: Asking questions for science; Constructing explanations for science; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information; Planning and carrying out investigations

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science, Communicate and Collaborate with other disciplines; Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Understand the relationship between Science and Society

Description: Play-based education, also known as play pedagogy, is an internationally utilized teaching methodology.   Play-based education encourages students to interact simultaneously with the physical and social world, developing scientific practices of observation, inquiry and experimentation within a societal context. Play is student-initiated, engaging them as active participants in both the learning and teaching process; establishing personal interest and developing critical thinking skills necessary for career preparation.  These aspects of play pedagogy make it an ideal methodology to fulfill the multiple dimensions of Next Generation Science Standards.  Participants will investigate play-based approaches connecting the presence, types and relationships of insects and plants in ecosystems to ecosystem services and ecological health.  Next Generation Science Standard performance expectations highlighted include Matter, Energy and Ecosystems, Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems and Human Sustainability.  Participants will also become familiar with the philosophy of play-based education, research behind its efficacy, opportunities for integration into curriculum, and share ideas on play-based engagement activities for high school and undergraduate students.

 

 Table #B5

ENSIweb: Evolution & NOS Classroom-tested Lessons & Other Resources

Lawrence Flammer, ENSIweb

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/ Active Learning, Hands On/ Minds Engaged

Topic: Evolution in Action

Other Topic: Nature of Science lessons – Beyond “The Scientific Method”

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Concepts: Ecosystems – Cycles of Matter and Energy Transfer in Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems; Evolution; Ecosystems – Adaption; Ecosystems – Biodiversity and Humans; Ecosystems – Evidence of Common Ancestry and Diversity; Ecosystems – Natural Selection;l Heredity; Heredity – Inheritance of Traits; Heredity – Variation of Traits; Structures and Processes; Structures and Processes – Growth and Development of Organisms; Structures and Processes – Information Processing; Structures and Processes – Organization of Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms; Structures and Processes – Structure and Function

Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data; Asking questions for science; Constructing explanations for science; Developing and using models; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information; Planning and carrying out investigations; Using mathematics and computational thinking

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Evolution; Information flow, exchange, and storage; Pathways and transformations of energy and matter; Structure and Function; Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science; Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science, Understand the relationship between Science and Society; Use modeling and simulation; Use quantitative reasoning

Description: The purpose of ENSI is to provide freely-downloadable, classroom-tested and interactive lessons for teaching the many aspects of NOS and evolution. Most of the lessons are for teachers’ use in the classroom, not for direct online student access. They are being widely used by teachers of secondary and undergraduate science courses. Most of the 75+ lessons directly target the many misconceptions about NOS and evolution. They use research-supported effective pedagogy in their implementation. The lessons meet virtually all NOS expectations in the NGSS and CCSS. Each lesson states the principal and associated concepts, and assessable objectives. Detailed teaching strategies are recommended for presenting most of the lessons. Materials and other resources (or links to them) are provided for all lessons. For details, see the ENSI General Information Page at <http://www.indiana.edu/~ensiweb/main.fr.html> .  There, you will find: The History of ENSI, Annual Reports, Faculty Publications, ENSI Concepts, a Web Site Map, and a List of Lessons. Here’s a link to the Webmaster’s Bio: < http://www.indiana.edu/~ensiweb/larry.html>.  A serious on-going effort for this site is to provide effective classroom lessons that demonstrate current research in the areas of evolution and NOS. We welcome appropriate and engaging classroom lessons, in the ENSI format, from scientists with current work that could be so-adapted. An outgrowth of ENSIweb is a little textbook for students in any grades 7-10 science course. It engages students with a text that integrates with several of the ENSI NOS lessons. It will soon be available as an e-book and a printed version. The book is titled Science Surprises. It has been peer-reviewed and field-tested by secondary science teachers. Teachers can also order, from the webmaster, the Teacher’s Guide for the most effective implementation of their unit on the nature of science. Copies of both will be freely available at the Roundtable.

 

Table #B6

QUBES Hub: A Vision of Online Collaboration in Teaching and Learning in Quantitative Biology

M. Drew LaMar, College of William and Mary

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/ Active Learning, Assess Learning/ Adapt Teaching

Other Type: Curriculum Development/Teacher Collaboration

Topic: General Biology and Mathematics

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data; Developing and using models; Using mathematics and computational thinking

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Competencies: Apply the process of Science; Communicate and Collaborate with other disciplines; Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Use modeling and simulation; Use quantitative reasoning

Description: Biological research, along with many other disciplines, has been relying more and more on quantitative and computational techniques to answer biological questions, with interdisciplinary collaborations becoming increasingly necessary. While online resources such as repositories of classroom materials exist to help instructors modify their curricula, there is no central location where instructors on both sides of the aisle (biology and mathematics) can come together to work on interdisciplinary teaching. To address these issues, we propose the creation of a central online hub (QUBES: Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis, http://www.qubeshub.org) to facilitate exchange amongst quantitative biology educators and bridge the gap between biologists and mathematicians who educate undergraduates at this interface. Our vision is that QUBES Hub will be designed to 1) be a repository for all types of curricular material. 2) give insight into how curricular material are being used.  3)give feedback and formal assessment of curricular material. 4) facilitate interactions among mathematicians and biologists. 5) stimulate and facilitate collaboration on educational projects. 6) be a HUB where curriculum content can be created, shared, modified, stored and organized, all in a heavily social, adaptive and collaborative context.  This roundtable will be an opportunity for participants to learn about the existing resource and contribute to the design and functionality of the site.  In particular, innovative ideas and ways of using the web as a teaching and curricular developing tool will be discussed. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1346584 in the Research Coordination Network: Undergraduate Biology Education track at the College of William and Mary.

 

Table #B7

Use of Flip Teaching to Enhance Student Understanding in High School Science Courses

Rob Iverson, Gunderson High School

Conference Track: Hands On/Minds Engaged

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12

Next Generation Science Standards

Concepts: Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Ecosystem Dynamics; Functioning and Resilience; Ecosystems – Biodiversity and Humans

Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data; Asking questions for science; Developing and using models; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Description: The purpose of the lesson is to engage high school students through the use of videos.  A series of short videos, approximately 2 minutes in length, will be produced by the instructor showing the need for a better understanding of the effects of climate change on the oceans.  Topics of potential videos will be: a welcome to the project, under sea video showing a variety of different habitats off of the Chanel Islands, a basic animation of what happens when water warms up.  This will lead students to the in class activity where they will perform an experiment to see water expansion as temperature changes.  There will be a video showing the students the proper set up of the apparatus, as well as some potential results, graphing of those results, and finally a presentation of the conclusion based on those results.  Students will be expected to create a short video, approximately 2 minutes in length, showing their results, stating their conclusion, as well as extrapolating the information out to how this may impact life on this planet. Learning objectives are that students will have a better understanding of how a change in temperature will cause an increase in sea level rise.  Students will also practice a variety of 21st century skills, such as presentation, group/teamwork, and communication skills.

 

 Table #B8

Engaging Students and Indigenous Communities in Global Health Research

Slavko Komarnytsky, NC State University; Debora Esposito, NC State University

Conference Track: Hands On/Minds Engaged

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics, Biodiversity, Drug Discovery

Intended audience: Grades 9-12, Undergraduate: Lower Division, Undergraduate: Upper Division, Graduate, Visiting scholars, Developing Countries

Next Generation Science Standards

Concepts:Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Social Interactions and Group Behavior; Ecosystems – Biodiversity and Humans; Ecosystems – Natural Selection; Structures and Processes – Growth and Development of Organisms; Structures and Processes – Structure and Function

Competencies:Analyzing and interpreting data; Asking questions for science; Constructing explanations for science; Developing and using models; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Structure and Function; Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science; Communicate and Collaborate with other disciplines; Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Understand the relationship between Science and Society; Use quantitative reasoning

Description: Globalization of research that encompasses biodiscovery, ecology, and health requires building capacity not only towards young scientists who decided on their professional careers, but also towards training our students and indigenous communities, who are eager to contribute to global health research, but often lack the relevant training, infrastructure, and resources. Mobile Discovery kit explores chemical biodiversity of local ecosystems and uncovers its potential to improve human health by rapidly measuring anti-infective properties of diverse biological samples, thus providing exceptional long-term student engagement in global health research. Each participant will be provided with a Mobile Discovery kit developed by the LIFE HABIT Center for Biodiscovery, a collaborative research partnership established by a team of internationally recognized faculty members from North Carolina State University, USA and University of Pretoria, South Africa, to maximize the great potential for interdisciplinary research in the area of biodiscovery and human health. The kit uses bacteria cultured from human saliva, requires no special tools other than those provided with the kit. Participants will be asked to photograph test samples with their mobile phones, perform a simple assay following a step-by-step guide with assistance from an instructor, and report results using an online reporting tool (http://lifehabitat.org). Ample opportunities for interaction and communication participant to participant, participant to instructor, and participant to content will be provided. By combining hands-on science (biodiscovery), information management (data reporting), and educational (training materials and manuals) components, this approach will reach both students and teachers to promote STEM involvement through educational innovation, increase interdisciplinary scholarship, and provide exceptional local and global long-term engagement to global health research. The presentation will also provide a valuable program feedback to facilitate future deployment of this program to other schools, undergraduate and graduate students, indigenous communities, and young scientists in developing countries of the world.

 

Table #B9 

Modules in Ecology and Evolution Development (MEED) Program

Laura Super, University of British Columbia; Catherine Hoffman; Adriana Suarez-Gonzale

Conference Track: Dynamic Teaching/Active Learning, Hands On/Minds Engaged

Topic: Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics; Evolution in Action

Other Topic: Ecology and Evolution

Intended Audience: Grades 9-12

Other Audience: The MEED program is for K-12 classrooms

Next Generation Science Standards                                                                                               

Concepts: Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Cycles of Matter and Energy Transfer in Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Ecosystem Dynamics; Functioning and Resilience; Ecosystems – Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems; Ecosystems – Social Interactions and Group Behavior; Evolution; Ecosystems – Adaption; Ecosystems – Biodiversity and Humans; Ecosystems – Evidence of Common Ancestry and Diversity; Ecosystems – Natural Selection; Heredity; Heredity – Inheritance of Traits; Heredity – Variation of Traits; Structures and Processes

Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data; Asking questions for science; Constructing explanations for science; Developing and using models; Engaging in argument from evidence; Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information; Planning and carrying out investigations; Using mathematics and computational thinking

Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

Concepts: Evolution; Structure and Function; Systems: Living systems interconnected and interacting

Competencies: Apply the process of Science; Communicate and Collaborate with other disciplines; Tap into the interdisciplinary nature of science; Understand the relationship between Science and Society; Use modeling and simulation; Use quantitative reasoning

Description: By the end of the conference roundtable:   Conference participants will have learned about the materials of the Modules in Ecology and Evolution Development (MEED) program. Participants will be given materials from the program (e.g. surveys, module material, etc.) in its first year (2013-2014). MEED is a new science outreach program of the University of British Columbia in partnership with K-12 teachers in Vancouver, Canada. The MEED blog is here: http://blogs.ubc.ca/meed/ . Ideas will be acquired on helping graduate student volunteers run science outreach programs in partnership with public school teachers. MEED is run by graduate student volunteers with their teacher partners. The MEED program participants have provided survey feedback at each stage of the program. The UBC Beaty Biodiversity Museum staff also helped the graduate students facilitate a professional development day, where the teachers and graduate students met and exchanged ideas; information from this event will be shared with conference participants. The Beaty Museum website is here: http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/.  There will be ideas exchanged on ways to bring cutting-edge biology research to high school classrooms. Conference participants will explore how to bridge the gap between the high school biology curriculum vs. cutting-edge biology research, and how to foster high school students’ interests in science. By serving as a bridge between K-12 education and current research, the MEED program aims to generate enthusiasm, understanding, and appreciation for the complexity of ecology and evolution.  Please note that currently MEED specifically targets ecology and evolution education. However, in the long-term, hopefully this program develops and expands to include other biological sciences. Conference participants are welcome to provide constructive feedback on directions they think would be useful for MEED.