From the Community: Atlantic garbage soup, rerouting the Red Sea and misnaming the fruit fly

Scientists develop a project to reroute water into the Dead Sea, male wasp spiders get a second chance at mating if they start with their sisters, 25% of fish in Dublin are mislabeled as completely different species and five species that cheated extinction. Here is the latest news in ecology for the third week in April. Earth Day: Last Thursday was Earth Day—in honor of the myriad of news coverage, Mental Floss gave a rundown of the...

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Bumblebee advertises infertility to avoid harassment, keep order in the colony

Bombus terrestris Credit: Alvesgaspar Researchers have found that pheromones play a key role in reproduction and social status in the buff-tailed bumblebee colony. Specifically, sterile female workers seem to advertise their infertility with extra pheromones in an attempt to ward off harassment from competing bees. The queen buff-tailed bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) lives for one cycle between winters, and in that time, the colony...

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The advantages of infidelity

Although not all birds mate for life, many do, and often mated pairs will stay together at least for the duration of a reproductive season.  Birds are sneaky, however, and some “sneaker” males will often try to stealthily mate with females within pairs.  Behavioral ecologists have many theories about why females engage in these extra-pair copulations. Since the birds can store sperm in specialized internal pouches, it may...

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