ESA Policy News December 17: Congress passes “CRomnibus” spending bill, Senate committee chairs announced, US Census public comment opportunity
Dec17

ESA Policy News December 17: Congress passes “CRomnibus” spending bill, Senate committee chairs announced, US Census public comment opportunity

Here are some highlights from the latest ESA Policy News by Policy Analyst Terence Houston. Read the full Policy News here.  APPROPRIATIONS: CONGRESS PASSES FY 2015 ‘CROMNIBUS’ FUNDING PACKAGE On Dec. 11, the US House of Representatives passed an omnibus bill to continue funding for most federal agencies through the remainder of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015. The Senate then passed a two-day continuing resolution (CR) to avoid a government shutdown. In a rare evening session on Dec. 13, the Senate passed the bill in a bipartisan vote of 56-40. Dubbed the “CRomnibus,” (a play on the words continuing resolution and omnibus), the bill funds most federal agencies throughout the remainder of FY 2015 ending on Sept. 30, 2015. The sole exception is the Department of Homeland Security, which is funded under a CR until Feb. 2015. Senate Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) and House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rodgers (R-KY) negotiated the compromise agreement. Under the measure, most federal agencies enjoyed only modest increases due to spending caps set forth under the Murray-Ryan budget agreement. The FY 2015 spending levels for federal agencies and programs of interest to the ecological community in comparison to FY 2014 enacted spending are as follows:  Agriculture Research Service: $1.8 billion, a $55.1 million increase. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service: $871 million, a $49 million increase. Bureau of Land Management: $1.1 billion, a $13.7 million increase. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management: $72.4 million, a $3.4 million increase.   Bureau of Reclamation: $1.1 billion, a $25.8 million increase. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement: $81 million, a $2.4 million increase. Department of Energy Biological and Environmental Research: $592 million, an $18.2 million decrease. Department of Energy Office of Science: $5.1 billion, level with FY 2014. Environmental Protection Agency: $8.1 billion, a $60.1 million decrease. National Aeronautics and Space Administration: $18 billion, a $364 million increase. National Science Foundation: $7.3 billion, a $172.3 million increase. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: $5.4 billion, a $126 million increase. Natural Resources Conservation Service: $858.4 million, a $33.5 million increase. National Park Service: $2.6 billion, a $53.1 million increase Smithsonian Institution: $819.5 million, a $14.5 million increase. US Army Corps of Engineers: $5.5 billion, a $15 million increase. US Forest Service: $5.1 billion, a $423.4 million decrease. US Fish and Wildlife Service: $1.4 billion, a $12.4 million increase. US Geological Survey: $1 billion, a $13 million increase. Click here for additional information on the FY 2015 omnibus bill. Click here for summaries of individual appropriations bills included in the FY 2015 omnibus. Click here for the White House Statement of Administration Policy. SENATE: COMMITTEE CHAIRS, RANKING MEMBERS ANNOUNCED FOR 114TH CONGRESS With the Senate set to change hands in January, Democrats and Republicans announced their picks for top committee positions...

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Scientists discuss some of the 5,000 new marine species discovered through census

Today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in San Diego, scientists participating in the Census of Marine Life (CoML) announced that the $650 million, 10-year collaboration will conclude on October 4-6, 2010 in London. More than 2,000 scientists from 80 countries have been collecting data on the diversity, distribution and abundance of marine life worldwide. One goal of CoML is to provide the science—such as migration patterns, genetics and population density—needed to conserve diversity and reverse habitat loss. Ian Poiner, chairman of CoML, explains one of the uses of these data in a sify.com news article: Now that we will have an inventory of marine life, say, by 2020 or 2030 we can say that certain animals are moving to cooler waters due to heating of the oceans or from shallow water to deeper due to pollution or harmful methods of fishing. Scientists at the AAAS meeting also highlighted some of the species discovered during the expeditions, like a furry crab found in 2005 off of Easter Island called the “yeti crab.” And a species of sponge found off of the Florida Keys in 1999 which produces an anti-cancer agent. According to a BBC article, that chemical is now being tested as a possible therapeutic.  Check out images of some of the marine life, including the “yeti crab” at the CoML...

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