Forgotten beetle hunters and the foundation of evolutionary theory; Alfred Wallace remembered in puppetry
Jan15

Forgotten beetle hunters and the foundation of evolutionary theory; Alfred Wallace remembered in puppetry

The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace (Director’s Cut) directed and produced by Flora Lichtman & Sharon Shattuck [Sweet Fern Productions].   “So he has this vision: he’s going to walk into a London scientific salon with a Toucan on his arm. He’s not going to be a nobody; he’s going to be a somebody.” ~Andrew Berry, Harvard University. Editor, Infinite Tropics, an Alfred Russel Wallace Anthology. In January of 1858,...

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The Last Reef

Advocacy film delivers “Cities beneath the Sea” in 3D IMAX, bringing you nudibranchs as you’ve never seen them before and activism that you have. By Liza Lester, ESA communications officer. La Evolución Silenciosa (The Silent Evolution), an installation of 400 life-size figures 9 meters under the sea off Cancun / Isla Mujeres, Mexico, is featured in the new IMAX film The Last Reef: Cities beneath the Sea. Credit, Jason deCaires...

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AAAS exhibition captures an undersea world worth conserving

This post contributed by Liza Lester, ESA communications officer “A composer, an artist, a physicist and a philosopher walk into a bar,” said artist Rachel Simmons, introducing her work to a crowd at the opening of Beneath the Surface: Rediscovering a World Worth Conserving at the American Association for the Advancement of Science on November 17th. What emerges is a curious combination of sound and graphics interpreting the...

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Ecological research in images

(Click the below image to view the photo gallery.) This week, the American Museum of Natural History launched the exhibit “Picturing Science: Museum Scientists and Imaging Technologies” which explores the images produced by scientists while performing research. The images range from bug genitalia to staghorn coral (see video at the end of this post). As quoted in a recent Wired Science article, “‘A lot of people come to the museum...

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Living video games, seed science and bat rescues

Video games that guide the movement of paramecia, dogs trained to aid in data collection, the evolution of seeds in the Amazon Rainforest, environmental degradation captured as art and the successful rescue of more than 100 bats stranded by the devastating floods in Australia. Here are stories in ecology for the third week in January 2011. PAC-mecium: Stanford University researchers have developed, not a life-like video game, but a...

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