Changes in science and the public

It is important to keep changes in perspective, this includes the overall influence of and public interest in science. In a session at the National Association of Science Writers’ (NASW) 2010 meeting last weekend, panelists and audience members discussed public interest in science and ways to increase this interest during a time of change. Carolyn Funk from Virginia Commonwealth University outlined the ways in which  public...

Read More

Science communication: from the field to the press

The reasons for sharing research with the media are relatively widely known: If a certain research topic is going to be highlighted as an important issue, then it needs to be shared with the public. And reporters are one of the best ways to give research exposure. The question, then, is what makes research newsworthy? David Lodge from the University of Notre Dame, Maywa Montenegro from Seed Magazine and Natasha Gilbert from Nature...

Read More

From the Community: A week of ecology in mixed media

Video describing the challenges of male pregnancy, photo gallery of the oldest trees in the world, podcast outlining Earth’s environmental tipping points and an article on adapting to the anthropocene. Here is ecological news from the third week in March: Icy life: NASA discovers amphipod—a shrimp-like creature—swimming 600 feet below the ice in Antarctica. Read more in “No sunlight, no food, frozen conditions, but NASA finds complex...

Read More

From the Community: Colonizing the oceans, fact-checking nursery rhymes and urbanizing mollusks

Aquanaut describes plans to colonize the sea for education and conservation, a pitcher plant previously thought to be carnivorous has been wildly reclassified and the first condor egg in 100 years discovered in California. Here are news stories and studies on ecological science from the second week in March: Sealab 2010: Former NASA aquanaut Dennis Chamberland plans to use his knowledge of ocean exploration and conservation to...

Read More

Scientists and filmmakers are making “Waves” together

This post contributed by Austin Gallagher, a fish biologist and filmmaker from Boston, MA. Even though most of my face was covered by neoprene, acrylic glass and rubber, I could still feel the whiskers of the harbor seal rub against my skin as he repeatedly kissed my face. Believe it or not, the harbor seal wasn’t the only marine organism that was showing me the love during a morning of scientific diving in a marine reserve off the...

Read More

Ecologists go online, the world benefits?

Science can take a page out of the World Health Organization’s book when it comes to tracking and aiding in global health.  Its online database, the Global Public Health Intelligence Network (GPHIN), is an early disease detection system developed by Health Canada; it collects data on unusual disease events by monitoring news wires, websites and online newspapers in eight languages. As a result, GPHIN currently captures the first hints...

Read More

The art of communicating climate change

This post was contributed by Piper Corp, ESA Science Policy Analyst   London-based writer and philosopher Alain de Botton recently shared his thoughts on the environment. In a UN Chronicle essay, de Botton says that climate change is different from threats we’ve faced in the past—whether natural disasters or nuclear warfare—in that it is neither outside our control nor a result of deliberate action. The product of the day-to-day...

Read More

A Conference about Water and Ecology

Nancy Grimm welcomes attendees to the first ESA Millennium Conference. ESA’s first Millennium Conference kicked off today in Athens, GA. The meeting is bringing together ecologists and social scientists to engage in conversations about one of the most dramatic emerging challenges in ecology: that of clean water and water scarcity.  While ecologists’ main expertise is in providing and maintaining adequate water for healthy...

Read More