ESA Policy News Update, July 13, 2016
Jul13

ESA Policy News Update, July 13, 2016

Appropriations and Energy: Congressional calendar may stall spending bills and energy reform Recess schedules and “poison pills” may compel a continuing resolution to keep government open.  Adaptation: Army Corps proposes “living shorelines” for coastline protection “Soft armor” protections proposed for nationwide permitting, as “hard armor” currently are. International Agreement: US,...

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‘Putting a face’ on science funding, Lear reflects on congressional visits experience
Jun06

‘Putting a face’ on science funding, Lear reflects on congressional visits experience

A guest commentary by Kristen Lear (University of Georgia), 2016 ESA Graduate Student Policy Award recipient As a 2016 ESA Graduate Student Policy Award (GSPA) recipient, I traveled to D.C. in late April for three days to receive hands-on exposure to the interface between science and policy. This was a departure from my “day-job” as a graduate student at the University of Georgia studying the conservation of an endangered pollinating...

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Reforming loose legal definitions of ecological restoration
May31

Reforming loose legal definitions of ecological restoration

Laws allowing open interpretation of ecological restoration undermine sound science in the recovery of self-sustaining living communities. Though mandates like the Clean Water Act have been powerful tools for instituting environmental protections in the United States, loose legal definitions of “restoration” mean that few mitigation projects install whole, functioning, and self-sustaining ecosystems. Likewise, programs aimed at...

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Mangy wolves suffer hefty calorie drain on cold, windy winter nights
Mar30

Mangy wolves suffer hefty calorie drain on cold, windy winter nights

An unwelcome dieting plan: severe mange infection could increase a wolf’s body heat loss by around 1240 to 2850 calories per night, which is roughly 60-80 percent of the average wolf’s daily caloric needs. During winter, wolves infected with mange can suffer a substantial amount of heat loss compared to those without the disease, according to a study by the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners, published as an Accepted...

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Disconnected ecosystem services
Feb17

Disconnected ecosystem services

The power of modern technology has made it possible to transport the benefits of ecosystems for human societies (ecosystem services) far from the source. In the February issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Jianguo Liu and colleagues examine the consequences in a very dramatic example, China’s enormous South-North Water Transfer Project, designed conduct water from the Yangtze River basin hundreds of miles to three...

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Kill da wabbit
Feb15

Kill da wabbit

A New Brunswick family helps remove invasive snowshoe hares from a group of remote Bay of Fundy Islands, five decades after introducing them as Bowdoin professor Nathaniel Wheelwright recounts in the February Natural History Note for Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. Too much of an adorable thing. Snowshoe hares like this one, photographed in its winter finery in Denali National Park, are native to North America and range...

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Population Ecology of Some Warblers of Northeastern Coniferous Forests #ESA100 notable papers
Feb02

Population Ecology of Some Warblers of Northeastern Coniferous Forests #ESA100 notable papers

Sixty years ago Robert MacArthur ventured into spruce woods in Maine and Vermont to study five species of warblers

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Building with Nature: the Dutch Sand Engine
Jan27

Building with Nature: the Dutch Sand Engine

“Cities are emergent systems, with only 5 to 7 thousand years of history, mostly during the relative climatic stability of the Holocene,” said guest editor Kristina Hill, an associate professor at UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design. “We’ve never tried to operate a city during a rapid climate change, especially not on the scale of population we now have, with our largest cities housing upwards of 20 million people.”

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