Armed conflict catches animals in the crossfire
Dec07

Armed conflict catches animals in the crossfire

Kaitlyn M Gaynor, a PhD candidate in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California–Berkeley (Berkeley, CA), shares this Frontiers Focus on the effects of war on wildlife. When people make war, wildlife often becomes a casualty. Explosives and war materials kill living things that are not their targets. Valuable wildlife products, like ivory, finance militias. But the most devastating...

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We can harvest bioenergy from preserves while protecting biodiversity
Nov30

We can harvest bioenergy from preserves while protecting biodiversity

Koenraad Van Meerbeek, a researcher in the Departement Aard- en Omgevingswetenschappen (Earth and Environmental Sciences) at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, shares this Frontiers Focus on the potential of Natura 2000 preserves to contribute biomass for bioenergy, without losing  biodiversity. Renewable energy from biomass, i.e. “bioenergy,” holds promise for climate change mitigation, but converting big tracts of land to...

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What is illegal wildlife trade?
Nov17

What is illegal wildlife trade?

By Jacob Phelps, lecturer in tropical environmental change and policy at Lancaster University in the United Kingdom. My co-authors and I study and think about wildlife trade in a wide range of contexts, from the actions of wildlife harvesters imprisoned in Nepali jails, to orchid traders at Thai markets, to criminal groups poaching South African rhinos. In the context of global conservation, we call all of their activities “illegal...

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Biodiversity hotspots are also hotspots of invasion
Oct24

Biodiversity hotspots are also hotspots of invasion

By Xianping Li, of the Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology within the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, as well as the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China. Li and colleagues’ Research Communications paper “Risk of biological invasions is concentrated in biodiversity hotspots” appeared in the October 2016 issue of ESA Frontiers. Biological invasions...

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Envisioning a good Anthropocene
Oct14

Envisioning a good Anthropocene

By Elena Bennett, associate professor at the McGill School of Environment and Department of Natural Resource Sciences in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Canada. Bennett and colleagues’ Concepts and Questions article “Bright Spots: Seeds of a Good Anthropocene” appeared in the October 2016 issue of ESA Frontiers.   We are constantly being bombarded with negative visions of the future, which may inhibit our ability to move...

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Getting the picture – cameras, marine biodiversity and human impact
Oct05

Getting the picture – cameras, marine biodiversity and human impact

By Anthony Bicknell, Associate Research Fellow at the Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, UK. We have all been captivated by the television wildlife documentaries that provide breath-taking video images of the previously unseen marine world. Although these may rely on the expertise of an experienced camera operator, camera technology has advanced to such an extent over recent years that even the most...

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Stop insuring fishery pirates
Sep27

Stop insuring fishery pirates

By Dana Miller, postdoctoral researcher at the University of British Columbia’s Fisheries Economics Research Unit in Vancouver, Canada. “Pirate” evokes images of legendary figures from the days of the great tall-masted sailing galleons, like Captain Henry Morgan, the famous 17th century “pirate of the Caribbean.” But piracy is still with us today, and modern pirates do not only steal from passing ships. They take from the common...

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Predator control should not be a shot in the dark
Sep07

Predator control should not be a shot in the dark

Although the protection of livestock from predators like wolves, cougars, and bears is hotly contested in the United States and Europe, control methods are rarely subjected to rigorous scientific testing. Non-lethal methods face higher standards of evidence—and are also generally more effective than killing predators, say Adrian Teves, Miha Krofel and Jeannine McManus. The trio conducted a systematic review of the available evidence....

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