The Ultimate Standoff: Hummingbird Vs. Caterpillar
Dec17

The Ultimate Standoff: Hummingbird Vs. Caterpillar

Researchers observe a defense mechanism for caterpillars can attract unwanted attention https://www.esa.org/esablog/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/MVI_0410-1920-1920.mp4 In a 26-minute standoff, a snake-mimicking caterpillar was unable to feed during attacks from a nest-defending hummingbird. (Video provided by James Marden) When a caterpillar disguises itself as a snake to ward off potential predators, it should probably expect to be...

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The Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana receives environmental offsets from the Ecological Society of America
Aug07

The Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana receives environmental offsets from the Ecological Society of America

NEW ORLEANS, LA. — The Ecological Society of America (ESA) will donate over $17,500  to the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana (CRCL) to offset the environmental costs of the Society’s 103rd Annual Meeting, held this year in New Orleans, LA. More than 3,500 attendees convene from across the globe this week to impart, discuss, and share the latest in essential ecological research and discovery. With so many in attendance, the...

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30 Years Later, Yellowstone Fires Are Still a Burning Problem
Aug05

30 Years Later, Yellowstone Fires Are Still a Burning Problem

103rd Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America: Extreme events, ecosystem resilience and human well-being 5–10 August 2018 Monica G. Turner served as President of ESA for the 2015-2016 term. She is an internationally recognized landscape ecologist, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and received ESA’s Robert H. MacArthur Award in 2008. Her field studies and simulation models have provided new insights into...

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Policy News: July 23, 2018
Jul23

Policy News: July 23, 2018

ESA Policy News In This Issue:   103 Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America convenes in New Orleans, LA The Opening Plenary talk by Robert Twilley, “Ecosystem design approaches in a highly engineered landscape of the Mississippi River Delta” will be live-streamed – watch it here on Sunday, August 5 at 5 PM central time. All Politics Are Local Engineers and Scientists Acting Locally (ESAL) founder...

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Member’s Perspective: Standing Up for Science Funding on Capitol Hill

By Ellen Stuart-Haëntjens, Ph.D. candidate, Virginia Commonwealth University Federally funded scientific research stimulates the economy, improves human health, bolsters national security and builds an educated workforce. In the United States the bulk of this funding comes through agencies like the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Health (NIH); however, since the 1980s, the percentage of US gross...

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Lizards, mice, bats and other vertebrates are important pollinators too
Apr05

Lizards, mice, bats and other vertebrates are important pollinators too

ESAFrontiers study reviews the global importance of vertebrate pollinators for plant reproduction Bees are not the only animals that carry pollen from flower to flower. Species with backbones, among them bats, birds, mice, and even lizards, also serve as pollinators. Although less familiar as flower visitors than insect pollinators, vertebrate pollinators are more likely to have co-evolved tight relationships of high value to the...

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Life of an albatross: ecologists tackle individuality in studies of populations
Feb28

Life of an albatross: ecologists tackle individuality in studies of populations

A study published in Ecological Monographs follows 9,685 wandering albatrosses throughout their long lives, seeking the intrinsic differences that make some individuals outstanding performers

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Finding common ground for cattle, fish, and people in the big mountain west
Feb09

Finding common ground for cattle, fish, and people in the big mountain west

A special issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment looks for new solutions to old problems by pooling the knowledge of scientists, ranchers, feds, community groups, and tribes   Tension between the needs of cattle and fish is a source decades of controversy in northeast Oregon’s Blue Mountains. Endangered bull trout, steelhead trout, Chinook salmon, and sockeye salmon require cold, clear water in mountain streams to...

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New Orleans greenery post-Katrina reflects social demographics more than storm impact
Sep15

New Orleans greenery post-Katrina reflects social demographics more than storm impact

Poetic post-apocalyptic visions of nature reclaiming city neighborhoods obscure public policy breach in disaster recovery, ecologists say Popular portrayals of “nature reclaiming civilization” in flood-damaged New Orleans, Louisianna, neighborhoods romanticize an urban ecology shaped by policy-driven socioecological disparities in redevelopment investment, ecologists argue in a new paper in the Ecological Society of America’s open...

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Integrating geographically isolated wetlands into land management
Aug30

Integrating geographically isolated wetlands into land management

Mark Rains is a Professor of Geology and the Director of the School of Geosciences at the University of South Florida, where he studies hydrological connectivity and the role it plays in governing structure and function in aquatic ecosystems. He shares this Frontiers Focus on how to integrate geographically isolated wetlands into land management decisions from a paper published in the August 2017 issue of ESA Frontiers. Wetlands are...

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