Students! Nominate yourselves for the Lotka and Volterra awards for theoretical ecology at #ESA2013
Jul11

Students! Nominate yourselves for the Lotka and Volterra awards for theoretical ecology at #ESA2013

Act fast! Entry is easy, but must be done by Monday, 15 July. If you are an undergraduate or graduate student presenting your application of conceptual and graphical models, mathematical analysis, or computer simulation to ecological phenomena at this year’s annual meeting in Minneapolis, ESA’s Theoretical Ecology section invites you to compete for their 14th annual Alfred J. Lotka prize for best poster and Vito Volterra...

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In phenology, timing is everything
Jul02

In phenology, timing is everything

— a brief overview of how to study climate change through plant sex, and what to do if your greatest scientific mentor and collaborator dies half a century before you are born. Caitlin McDonough MacKenzie, a PhD candidate in ecology at Boston University, is the runner-up for this year’s Science Cafe Prize. She took a technical topic, made it personal, and bridged history in words and pictures. We liked her image so much that we...

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Lisa Schulte Moore’s agro-ecology pitch takes the ESA2013 Science Cafe Prize
Jul01

Lisa Schulte Moore’s agro-ecology pitch takes the ESA2013 Science Cafe Prize

Lisa Schulte Moore won the inaugural ESA2013 Science Cafe Prize with her vision for change in modern agriculture based on ecological knowledge and experimentation. Schulte Moore, a professor of landscape ecology at Iowa State University, will speak at the Aster Cafe on the riverfront in Minneapolis, Minnesota during ESA’s annual meeting in August. Read her winning entry below! Want to stem biodiversity loss, enhance fresh water...

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ESA2013 Science Cafe Prize — call for submissions!
Jun01

ESA2013 Science Cafe Prize — call for submissions!

  Have you ever wanted to escape the conference center during the ESA Annual Meeting and talk science with the locals? This August at the 98th Annual Meeting in Minneapolis, we are launching a Science Café – a chance to tell local pub-goers about your ecological passions in a casual environment. Science Café puts you within arm’s reach of your audience. The venue encourages lively conversation, both during and after the...

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Building a community that thrives online

Sandra Chung knows social media. As a communications specialist for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) she handles all things multimedia, including spearheading NEON’s Twitter feed (@NEONinc, with Jennifer Walton), and Facebook page. Last week, Sandra wrote about the power of Twitter to open up a meeting (the Ecological Society of America’s 97th annual meeting, to wit) and start conversations both in the...

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Watching the river flow – the complex effect of stream variability on Bristol Bay’s wildlife

Sylvia Fallon, a Senior Scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council, blogged about ecosystem dynamics and the key role of salmon in Alaska’s Bristol Bay watershed last week, in a post inspired by Peter Lisi’s presentation at ESA’s 2012 annual meeting in Portland. Peter is a postdoc in Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. Here’s an excerpt from Sylvia’s post: Bristol Bay in...

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An Interconnection of Ecologists (#ESA2012)

Bruce Byers wrote up his impressions of the recent ESA Annual Meeting in a recent blog post: 12th of August, 2012. Old English is full of “terms of venery,” words for groups of animals: a pod of whales, a pack of wolves, a herd of deer, a gaggle of geese, a murder of crows, a pride of lions, a leap of leopards, a kettle of hawks, a parliament of owls. Most of these terms tried to say something about the behavior of the species they...

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ESA session showcases minority outreach opportunities

This post contributed by Terence Houston, ESA Science Policy Analyst During the Ecological Society America’s (ESA) 2012 annual meeting in Portland, an organized oral session showcased several programs and initiatives that work to expand ecological education and job opportunities for the nation’s underrepresented minorities.  During the session “Increasing Representation of Minorities in Ecology: What Works?” attendees heard from...

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