“Nothing is hard, only new” – navigating interdisciplinary graduate research
Jan13

“Nothing is hard, only new” – navigating interdisciplinary graduate research

In this guest post, Kellen Marshall shares the realistic barriers of interdisciplinary work as a doctoral student. Marshall is a native Chicagoan and current doctoral candidate of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  She is also the Director of the George Washington Carver Research Station at Eden Place Nature Center on Chicago’s south side. Kellen has used her passion for the field of ecology to...

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Why I did a Science Cafe – a guest post by Lisa Schulte Moore
Dec12

Why I did a Science Cafe – a guest post by Lisa Schulte Moore

A guest post by Lisa Schulte Moore, Associate Professor of Natural Resource Ecology and Management at Iowa State University. Last spring, Lisa Schulte Moore won the chance to speak to a happy hour crowd at the Aster Cafe in Minneapolis, MN, during our Annual Meeting. Schulte Moore came through with flying colors, drawing an audience in from a beautiful, blue, August evening to talk about “Agricultural Change: Making a better...

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What’s the Future of Ecologist-Communicators?
Aug15

What’s the Future of Ecologist-Communicators?

This guest post is by Holly Menninger, Director of Public Science for Your Wild Life at NC State University. Engage. Communicate. Reach out. Engage. Communicate. Reach out. These words echoed throughout the hallways of the Minneapolis Convention Center last week like a mantra. From organized symposia to high-energy Ignite sessions, ecologists both urged for and heard a rallying call to cross boundaries during this year’s Annual...

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ConservationCorridor.org collects all things wildlife corridor-related
Dec20

ConservationCorridor.org collects all things wildlife corridor-related

A guest post by Heather Lessig, a ConservationCorridor moderator and research technician in Nick Haddad’s lab at NC State LANDSCAPE corridors are among the most important conservation strategies in the face of global changes such as habitat fragmentation, habitat destruction, and climate change.  Corridors are habitats that are typically long relative to their width, and they connect fragmented patches of habitat.  The main goal...

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A coordinated national strategy for wildlife conservation
Dec15

A coordinated national strategy for wildlife conservation

Starting and maintaining the conversation A guest post by Vicky Meretsky, associate professor at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs HOW do you begin and maintain a conversation related to wildlife conservation at the national level with 50 state agencies, a handful or two of federal agencies and several national-level NGOs, at the same time? I and my colleagues started by publishing a commentary in the...

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Seeing (less) red: Bark beetles and global warming

This post contributed by Jesse A. Logan, retired research entomologist living in Emigrant, Montana. The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) is an ecological reserve of regional, national and international significance. This collection of National Parks, National Forests, wildlife reserves and tribal lands is generally recognized as one of the last remaining large, nearly intact, ecosystems of the Earth’s northern temperate...

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URBAANE: An urban environmental conference for communities of color
Jul12

URBAANE: An urban environmental conference for communities of color

This post contributed by Kellen Marshall-Gillespie, University of Illinois-Chicago, NSF-IGERT LEAP Fellow and 2011 ESA Graduate Student Policy Award winner. As an active member of the Ecological Society of America and its Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity and Sustainability (SEEDS) program and environmental justice (EJ) section, I understand and support the Society’s vested interest in accomplishing meaningful broader...

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Are seagrasses buried under urban development?

Seagrass populations are facing major declines in the midst of global climate change and increasing urban development along coasts, according to a study conducted at the request of the International Union of the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Frederick Short from Jackson Estuarine Laboratory in New Hampshire and colleagues reported that, of the 72 species of known seagrass, 10 species are classified at a higher risk of extinction and...

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