Teach your children well
Jan20

Teach your children well

In another great guest post, landscape ecologist Lisa Schulte Moore shares stories of infusing everyday kid activities with a connection to science and nature—and, most importantly, having fun doing it.

Read More
Forgotten beetle hunters and the foundation of evolutionary theory; Alfred Wallace remembered in puppetry
Jan15

Forgotten beetle hunters and the foundation of evolutionary theory; Alfred Wallace remembered in puppetry

The history of science is filled with famous, pivotal individuals, who were in fact surrounded by brilliant, inquisitive colleagues working on the same goals, ideas, collections, and experiments. The puppets tell the tale.

Read More
“Nothing is hard, only new” – navigating interdisciplinary graduate research
Jan13

“Nothing is hard, only new” – navigating interdisciplinary graduate research

In this guest post, Kellen Marshall, a doctoral candidate at the University of Illinois, shares the challenges of combining her passions for environmental justice and ecological research.

Read More
Oysters of New York
Jan09

Oysters of New York

Denitrification heroes?
The dense urban life of Queens surrounds Jamaica Bay, NY, where Timothy Hoellein and Chester Zarnoch measured the effect of oysters on the nitrogen cycle. Can oysters help remove an excess of the nutrient from the bay?

Read More
Why I did a Science Cafe – a guest post by Lisa Schulte Moore
Dec12

Why I did a Science Cafe – a guest post by Lisa Schulte Moore

“Being a native of Wisconsin – land of beer, brats, and polkas – I’ve always dreamed of delivering a science presentation with a drink in my hand.” — Lisa Schulte Moore writes about her new adventures in public outreach at the Science Cafe, and as a fellow in the Leopold Leadership program.

Read More