Luring mosquitoes into honeysuckle traps
Jul20

Luring mosquitoes into honeysuckle traps

Beyond the blood meal, mosquitoes need sugar and safe and nurturing pools to cradle their eggs and emerging larva. Fallen leaves floating in still water (like residential stormwater drainage ditches) make appealing hatcheries for the common house mosquito (Culex pipiens), a carrier of West Nile virus. At the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, this August, Allison Gardner will present the results of experiments manipulating egg laying and larval survival in a suburban storm drainage system during a session on Disease Ecology (II). Gardner and colleagues found that the leaves of native common blackberry (Rubus allegheniensis) are attractive to gravid female mosquitoes, but inimical to their larvae. Invasive Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) both attracts females to lay eggs and favors survival to adulthood. The different communities of bacteria that live on the plants appear to play a role in the survival of mosquito larvae. The researchers experimented with honeysuckle leaf “traps” coated in unfriendly bacteria. COS 17-1 -Direct and indirect effects of native and invasive plants on mosquito ecology Tuesday, August 9, 2016: 8:00 AM, room Palm B, Ft Lauderdale Convention Center Allison M. Gardner, School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, Orono, ME Browse more presentations about mosquito ecology at the 2016 Annual Meeting....

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Take the sustainability research leadership survey
Jul14

Take the sustainability research leadership survey

Calling ecological researchers around the globe: How do you collaborate across disciplines and institutional sectors? A guest post by Josh Tewksbury, natural historian, global hub director of Future Earth, board member for the Leopold Leadership Program, and a research professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder     The Leopold Leadership Program, Future Earth, START, and researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder would like 15 minutes of your time for a survey they have co-developed. The anonymous results will help them learn how to facilitate capacity for transdisciplinary research on sustainable development around the world. take the survey   Who: graduate students and post-docs; pre-, post-, and non-tenure-track folks in academic institutions; and researchers working in NGOs, think tanks, government, and the private sector Why: To build understanding of the skills, tools, competencies, and other capacities which researchers need in order to construct usable knowledge for sustainable development Intended outcomes: 1) A peer-reviewed paper; 2) a white paper to inform funding communities about where the gaps are; 3) data to inform program strategies for our organizations and for funders Time commitment: 10-15 minutes to complete the survey   Future Earth, the Leopold Leadership Program, and START, a global science capacity building organization, want to gain a greater understanding of the barriers, motivations, skills and competencies that researchers face as they attempt to work across disciplines and with non-research professionals.  The three organizations collaborated with Amanda Carrico an expert on survey design at the University of Colorado Boulder, to come up with the first global assessment focusing on these issues. The first survey is now live.  It takes about 15 minutes to complete and focuses on the skills, tools, and capacities which researchers need in fields critical to conservation and sustainable development in order to co-construct credible, relevant scientific knowledge with users of that knowledge. In addition, the survey explores the motivations for this work, and the barriers researchers face when they go down this path. The survey and associated information are anonymous. Our goal is to capture the diversity we need to provide some of the first global information on training needs for researchers who want to work across disciplines in fields related to conservation and sustainable development. We want to hear from people across the research community: graduate students and post-docs; pre-, post-, and non-tenure-track folks in academic institutions; and researchers working in NGOs, think tanks, government, and the private sector. We have results from almost 90 countries so far, but the penetration in ecology is still low. I would love to use the results of the survey to learn how ecologists see these problems, compared with, for example, economists, or engineers. The results from this...

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Richard Hobbs named Honorary Member of ESA
Jun10

Richard Hobbs named Honorary Member of ESA

Honorary Membership is given to a distinguished ecologist who has made exceptional contributions to ecology and whose principal residence and site of ecological research are outside of North America. Richard Hobbs, a professor of restoration ecology at the University of Western Australia, is an innovative, collaborative scientist with proven capacity to bridge the fields of basic and applied ecology. He laid foundational work in the area of novel ecosystems, the theme of the forthcoming 2016 ESA Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Fl., and his research focuses on applying ecology in a rapidly changing world. He promotes ample, fruitful debate within our community and beyond. In addition to receiving his award, Dr. Hobbs will be at ESA’s annual meeting in Florida this August for a symposium on novel ecosystems and adaptive management in the anthropocene. SYMP 17-3 – It’s a mixed up, muddled up, shook up world: Managing altered landscapes and new species combinations, Thursday, August 11, 2016 at 9:00 AM. ESA will present the 2016 awards during the 2016 Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Fl. The awards ceremony will take place on Monday, August 8, at 8 AM in the Floridian Ballroom AB, Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center. Read about all of the 2016 award winners in the awards master post or as individual entries on...

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#ESA2016 Forest Shreve Student Research Fund awarded to Nameer Baker and Camila Medeiros
Jun09

#ESA2016 Forest Shreve Student Research Fund awarded to Nameer Baker and Camila Medeiros

The Shreve award supplies $1,000-2,000 to support ecological research by graduate or undergraduate student members of ESA in the hot deserts of North America (Sonora, Mohave, Chihuahua, and Vizcaino). Nameer Baker, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Irvine, works on the effects of climate on microbial decomposition and carbon cycling in desert systems.   Camila Medeiros, who is beginning a doctoral program at the University of California, Los Angeles, focuses on the physiological ecology and mechanistic basis of species responses to water availability and drought in plant communities across California. Ms. Medeiros will present her work on “Stomatal trait-based ecology: Variation within and among Hawaiian tropical forests and relationship with other functional traits” at ESA’s 2016 Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Florida this August. ESA will present the 2016 awards during the 2016 Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Fl. The awards ceremony will take place on Monday, August 8, at 8 AM in the Floridian Ballroom AB, Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center. Read about all of the 2016 award winners in the awards master...

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Simoneta Negrete-Yankelevich and Ezatollah Karami win the #ESA2016 Whittaker Award
Jun06

Simoneta Negrete-Yankelevich and Ezatollah Karami win the #ESA2016 Whittaker Award

The Robert H. Whittaker Award recognizes an outstanding ecologist in a developing country who does not currently reside in the United States and is not a U.S. citizen. Whittaker, a prolific plant community ecologist, is most widely known his five-kingdom taxonomic classification system for living things, which drew from his early, influential work on trophic levels, environmental gradients and community classification and became a standard feature of late twentieth century biology textbooks. His diplomatic efforts to mend tensions with European ecologists brought him recognition and respect internationally. The Whittaker Award is open to ecologists at any career stage and covers expenses up to $1,200 for travel to the United States for research or to attend a meeting. Simoneta Negrete-Yankelevich is an outstanding researcher (equivalent to “senior scientist” at U.S. institutions) at the Instituto de Ecología A.C. (INECOL), in Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico. Her research focuses on soil ecology, its application to indigenous agroecosystems, and spatial ecology. She has a very active research career and many high profile accomplishments. She will present her research on “Coupling of above and belowground diversities sustain soil functions in traditional agriculture in Mexico” at ESA’s 2016 Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Florida this August. Ezatollah Karami, a professor at Shiraz University in Iran, does applied research in agroecology and water sustainability. The selection committee was impressed with his contributions, and welcomes the re-integration of outstanding ecologist colleagues from Iran after the country’s many years of isolation. He will present his research on “Socio-ecological impacts of dams in developing countries in the context of climate change” at the 2016 Annual Meeting. ESA will present the 2016 awards during the 2016 Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Fl. The awards ceremony will take place on Monday, August 8, at 8 AM in the Floridian Ballroom AB, Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center. Read about all of the 2016 award winners in the awards master...

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