Frontiers gets an app

Beta testers wanted Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment launched a new app this week that lets you browse the journal on your tablet or smartphone (though, to be honest, it’s designed for the larger tablet screen and looks pretty small on a phone—you’ll do a lot of zooming). If you don’t have a smart-device, you can download the app to your desktop for a more perusable electronic reading experience. The app version of Frontiers...

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Changing climate, changing landscape: monitoring the vast wilderness of interior Alaska
Mar28

Changing climate, changing landscape: monitoring the vast wilderness of interior Alaska

Listen: stream or download the Field Talk interview with National Park Service ecologist Carl Roland on ESA’s podcast page, or on iTunes. by Liza Lester, ESA communications officer “The current landscape is a mosaic, and it has different attributes, and it’s likely that whatever change happens is going to result in a mosaic as well, not this idea of [complete] replacement of conifer to broadleaf. And I think most people in the...

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Is the world failing at conservation?

A #ScienceLive Chat on Thursday, 28 March at 3pm EDT Moderated by Erik Stokstad, a staff  journalist covering environmental research and policy, with a focus on natural resources and sustainability, for the Science Magazine news team. Obstreperous Peter Kareiva, chief scientist of the Nature Conservancy, who has ruffled feathers in the conservation community with his strong views on new directions for environmentalism, will be online...

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New strategic vision for field stations and marine labs

Field stations and marine labs take on the future of science In this guest post, Ian Billick, PhD,  introduces the new strategic vision, released today, for the disparate network of field stations and marine labs. Recommendations include creating virtual access to historic data archives and streamlining physical access to field sites for extramural researchers. Billick  is Past President of the Organization of Biological Field...

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Predicting peak cropland

Can we control our destiny? by Liza Lester, ESA communications officer Population by Total Fertility (millions). The United Nations predicts 10.1 billion living humans will inhabit the Earth by 2100. Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2011): World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision. New York. Joe Fargione, lead scientist for The Nature Conservancy’s North American Region, wants...

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