How to sneak into grad school

After 12 years of formal education (13 if you count kindergarten) and four years of college, one would think I would be sick of school. However, I saw only two options: get a real job and become a real adult or keep going to school. Higher education seemed like the best plan! The only problem there was no clear road map telling me what to do after college. I wasn’t even sure if I should choose vet school or grad school, and if I...

Read More

Facing the prospect of rapid warming

Fossil trees in Antarctica show us that climate has changed greatly in the past. Suppose the current warming is just part of a longer trend that we can’t do anything about? It is worth looking at what we know about global climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels for the past 10,000 years—the Holocene. That period includes the entire history of organized human society—culture, trade, language, money, agriculture and...

Read More

ESA wants you(r photographs)

Have you noticed the changing “ecosystem” banner photo on the ESA home page? How about the pictures of ecologists (that’s you!)? We will be featuring a new ecosystem once each month, and changing the other pictures periodically. If you have a great photo of your favorite ecosystem, or of your favorite ecologist, send it to liz@esa.org and you may find it featured here at www.esa.org! Please send the highest...

Read More

Embracing blogs and other tools of the information age

I was struck between the parity between the ongoing discussion on this blog about the usage of blogs in academia and Sunday’s New York Times article on how the intelligence community is using blogs and wikis for information synthesis, and a recent post at evolgen asking if there were any ecologists in the blogosphere. Taken together, I think they raise some interesting questions, comments, and ideas about whether we are...

Read More

Helping the developing world adapt to climate change

Cristina Rumbaitis del Rio discusses “The role of ecological theory and practice in poverty alleviation and environmental conservation,” in the latest Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. The daily challenges of survival in the developing world are often fundamentally ecological in nature. The world’s poorest people are highly dependent on ecosystem services to provide food, clean water, and energy in the form of...

Read More