UMD Professor David Inouye named President of the Ecological Society of America

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Contact: Alison Mize, 202-833-8773 ext. 205, Alison@esa.org

 

140923 David Inouye with flowersDavid Inouye, plant ecologist and professor emeritus of the Department of Biology at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park has been named President of the Ecological Society of America.

Elected by the members of ESA for a one-year term, Inouye presides over the world’s largest professional society of ecologists. Its membership comprises 10,000 researchers, educators, natural resource managers and students, reflecting the diverse interests and activities of the Society. As President, Inouye now chairs ESA’s governing board, which lays out the Society’s vision for overall goals and objectives.

“I’m greatly honored to be leading the ESA as it reaches its 100th anniversary. I’ve been a member for over four decades, since I was a graduate student, and have watched and participated as the Society has grown in membership, number and prestige of journals published, size of its annual meeting, and all other metrics of success.

The Washington, D.C. office provides a valuable service to government and other organizations by making the expertise of its membership available for advice on ecological issues, and we have an excellent educational program that is helping to train a diverse next generation of ecologists.

We will also expand our international impact this year as we jointly publish a new journal with the Ecological Society of China. I look forward to the next century of growth and success by the Society,” Inouye said.

Inouye’s pollinator and wildflower research has encompassed pollination biology, flowering phenology, plant demography and plant-animal interactions in both the US and abroad since 1971. Over his 44-year tenure at the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab near Crested Butte, Colorado, Inouye has discovered that the wildflower growing season has increased by 35 days since the 1970s. His long-term studies of flowering phenology and plant demography are providing insights into the effects of climate change at high altitudes.

He is a lead author for the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) fast-track assessment of pollinators, pollination and food production, sits on the governing boards of the North American Pollinator Protection Campaign and the USA-National Phenology Network, is a is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Roundtable on Public Information in the Life Sciences, and serves on numerous scientific publication editorial boards.

Inouye has taught courses in ecology and conservation biology at UMD and also instructed at the University of Colorado’s Mountain Research Station, the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, and with the Organization for Tropical Studies.

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ESA is the world’s largest community of professional ecologists and a trusted source of ecological knowledge, committed to advancing the understanding of life on Earth.  The 10,000 member Society publishes sixjournalsand broadly shares ecological information through policy and media outreach and education initiatives. The Society’s Annual Meeting attracts over 3,000 attendees and features the most recent advances in ecological science. Visit the ESA website at http://www.esa.org.

USGS scientist named Ecological Society of America president

For immediate release:  Monday, 9 September 2013                        

Contact: Terence Houston (202) 833-8773 x 224; terence@esa.org

ESA president Jill Baron. Credit: ESA file photo.

ESA president Jill Baron. Credit: ESA file photo.

Jill Baron, an ecosystem ecologist with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a senior research ecologist with Colorado State University’s Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, has been named President of the Ecological Society of America (ESA), the world’s largest organization of professional ecologists. As president, Baron now chairs ESA’s governing board, which lays out the vision for overall goals and objectives for the Society. 

“Ecologists explore the organisms and processes that make up the living world, but we also evaluate the environmental and societal consequences of human activities,” said Baron.  “For many of us, this knowledge drives us to seek solutions and promote better stewardship of our natural resources. As well we should: the funding that supports our work comes with the expectation that we will give back to the public that subsidizes us; this is something I, as a civil servant, am keenly aware of. The Ecological Society of America is a tremendously effective vehicle for discharging our responsibility to society.  ESA’s rich portfolio of activities, from its influential journals, public affairs and communication activities, education, science office, and vibrant meetings, reflect how the Society both promotes the science and its application.  It is an honor and a privilege for me to help lead these tasks.”  

Baron is co-Director of the John Wesley Powell Center for Earth System Science Analysis and Syntheisis, a center founded to promote the emergence of new knowledge through interdisciplinary collaboration.  Baron’s own research has helped inform policy related to air-quality issues in the state of Colorado. For over three decades, she has researched the effects of atmospheric deposition and climate change on Rocky mountain lakes, forests, and soils.    Her work has garnered recognition from a swath of federal agencies. Most recently, she was recognized with two National Park Service awards: the 2012 Intermountain Region Regional Director’s Natural Resource Award and the 2011 Rocky Mountain National Park Stewardship Award. She was also honored with Department of Interior Meritorious Service Award in 2002.

Baron was editor of ESA’s Issues in Ecology for several years and previously served as Member at Large on ESA’s governing board. Baron was lead author of the US Climate Change Science Program report on Climate Change Adaption Options for National Parks, and a contributor to the National Climate Assessment.  She has served on the Department of Interior’s Climate Change Task Force and was part of the Science Strategy Team that structured the scientific direction of the USGS. She has authored over 140 publications and edited two books, including Rocky Mountain Futures, an ecological perspective that addresses past, present, and future human-environment interactions.

 

The Ecological Society of America is the world’s largest community of professional ecologists and the trusted source of ecological knowledge.  ESA is committed to advancing the understanding of life on Earth.  The 10,000 member Society publishes five journals, convenes an annual scientific conference, and broadly shares ecological information through policy and media outreach and education initiatives. Visit the ESA website at http://www.esa.org or find experts in ecological science at http://www.esa.org/pao/rrt/.