Meetings

Please join us for Environmental Justice-related events at the upcoming ESA Annual Meeting, to be held from August 4-9, 2013 in Minneapolis, MN!

For notes and presentations from previous Environmental Justice events at ESA Annual Meetings, click here.


Environmental Justice section events:

ESA Applied Ecology, Agroecology, Urban Ecosystems, Human Ecology, and Environmental Justice Joint Mixer
Tuesday, August 6, 2013: 6:30 PM-8:00 PM
200D, Minneapolis Convention Center

ESA Environmental Justice Business Meeting
Wednesday, August 7, 2013: 11:30 AM-1:15 PM
Director’s 4, Hilton Minneapolis
All are welcome to share ideas and get involved in section activities!

Workshops and Special Sessions:

SS 4: Generating a Historical Time Line of ‘Earth Stewards’ to Inspire Our Future
Monday, August 5, 2013: 10:15 AM-11:30 AM
101E, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Robert A. Dyball
[see full description]

WK 41: Developing Action Plans for Incorporating Environmental Justice (EJ) in Ecological Research and Education: Learning from Diverse EJ Practitioners How to Shape Future Community Sustainability
Tuesday, August 6, 2013: 8:00 PM-10:00 PM
L100B, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Carmen R. Cid
[see full description]

WK 51: Launching A Scientists’ Speakers Bureau for Outreach to Faith and Justice Communities
Thursday, August 8, 2013: 11:30 AM-1:15 PM
Director’s 2, Hilton Minneapolis
Organizer: Gregory E. Hitzhusen
[see full description]

Fostering Community-Ecologist Partnerships for Environmental Justice
Friday, August 9, 2013: 12:00 PM-5:00 PM
University of Minnesota Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center, 2001 Plymouth Ave. North, Minneapolis, MN
Organizer: Megan Gregory
[see full description]

Symposia and Organized Oral Sessions:

OOS 7: Doing Justice Through Your Research: Following Your Passion and Creating a Just Society as an Ecologist
Tuesday, August 6, 2013: 8:00 AM-11:30 AM
101B, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Leanne M. Jablonski
[see full description]

SYMP 13: Can Ethics and Justice Pave a Sustainable Pathway for Human Ecosystems?
Wednesday, August 7, 2013: 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
M100EF, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Mimi E. Lam
[see full description]


SS 4: Generating a Historical Time Line of ‘Earth Stewards’ to Inspire Our Future
Monday, August 5, 2013: 10:15 AM-11:30 AM
101E, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Robert A. Dyball
Co-organizers: Leanne M. Jablonski and Mimi E. Lam

This session introduces the potential contribution of an historical timeline of past ESA and other ecologists’ contributions to the understanding of human agency in ecological change processes – what is today promoted as ‘Earth Stewardship’. Members of ESA’s human-centred Sections will 1) generate a list of ESA contributions that aid understanding this important topic and 2) develop biographical sketches of Earth Stewards. Results will help us assess how ecologists have interacted with societal movements and environmental events impacting ecosystem sustainability. In anticipation of ESA’s 100th anniversary, the results will celebrate ESA’s major contribution to Earth Stewardship, inspire younger members and foster future research efforts. The timeline software ‘Tiki Toki’, recommended by the Historical Records Committee, will be used. This session is organized by past Chairs of the Environmental Justice, Human Ecology and Traditional Ecological Knowledge Sections in collaboration with other human-centered Sections. We will overview how the various ‘human-centred’ Sections of ESA, the broader ESA community and other basic and applied ecologists might benefit from this collaboration. Next, we will present a brief guide of what makes a compelling historical biographical sketch, and demonstrate how Tiki-Toki works, including how to upload a biography, edit or enhance a biography and link to other resources and archives. We will then open discussion of suitable ‘Earth Stewards’ to initially populate the timeline, together with a call for commitment from individuals to generate first drafts. Progress will be revisited at the 2014 ESA Meeting, in preparation for a presentation at the 2015 Centennial.


WK 41: Developing Action Plans for Incorporating Environmental Justice (EJ) in Ecological Research and Education: Learning from Diverse EJ Practitioners How to Shape Future Community Sustainability
Tuesday, August 6, 2013: 8:00 PM-10:00 PM
L100B, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Carmen R. Cid
Co-organizers: Leanne M. Jablonski, Megan M. Gregory, Jennifer L. Shirk and Tiffany S. Carey
Moderator: Scott J. Peters
Speaker: Heidi L. Ballard

Ecologists promote environmental justice (EJ) through participatory research, education, and policy engagement with diverse communities. However, identifying EJ dimensions of one’s work and engaging diverse collaborators in meaningful ways requires guidance from EJ practitioners and trans-disciplinary collaborations. In this workshop, participants will develop action plans to integrate EJ in their research and education projects and institutional cultures. We will draw on insights from various traditions of public participation in scientific research (PPSR) to provide practical guidance for planning community-based projects. The workshop is designed for ecology students, advisers, research scientists and their collaborators. It accompanies and features presenters from the OOS “Doing Justice Through Your Research: Following Your Passion and Creating a Just Society as an Ecologist”. Format will include: a) participant introductions, b) overview of frameworks for designing community-based research and education projects for desired outcomes, and examples of how ecologists are infusing EJ into their work, c) guided plan development process, including reflection questions to consider when shaping a community-based project to advance EJ, d) small group discussion, and e) large group sharing of initial plans and feedback on best ways to adapt and implement them. Workshop leaders will share ESA-EJ and PPSR resources and facilitate discussion with planning questions including: What are the challenges to justice-oriented research and education in your particular context/project? What support do you need to effectively address those challenges? What experiences/resources can you suggest for others? What are the venues for developing and sharing this type of work (with academic and practitioner communities)?


WK 51: Launching A Scientists’ Speakers Bureau for Outreach to Faith and Justice Communities
Thursday, August 8, 2013: 11:30 AM-1:15 PM
Director’s 2, Hilton Minneapolis
Organizer: Gregory E. Hitzhusen
Co-organizers: Leanne M. Jablonski and Forest I. Isbell
Speakers: Matthew Anderson, Dorothy Boorse, Nalini Nadkarni and Douglas H. Boucher

This session builds on previous ESA annual meeting sessions to advance the implementation of a national speakers bureau in partnership with national faith bodies and community-based justice organizations. With 83% of the American public (including 71% of ESA members surveyed) claiming membership in over 300,000 congregations, religious organizations and their partners are uniquely positioned to engage citizens in ecological issues. Developing ecologically fruitful collaboration between scientists and these communities can help bridge historic divides and provide sound science to shape sustainable ecosystem futures. Over the past year, participants from 2011 and 2012 ESA meeting speakers bureau workshops have piloted diverse outreach efforts to faith communities nationwide, tracked their impact, and shared outcomes through ongoing networking conference calls and webinars. We will review the successes and challenges of ESA members’ outreach to date, highlight the analysis of these outreach approaches, and summarize the commitments of partner organizations to help formally launch the speakers bureau. We will also address remaining issues related to implementing the speakers bureau, and discuss and formulate recommendations for ESA and our partners. Speakers from partner organizations (e.g. Interfaith Power and Light, National Religious Partnership for the Environment, Union of Concerned Scientists) will highlight collaborators’ perspectives in this emerging dialogue between ecologists and a range of communities, and describe key examples of outreach that can be replicated. All ESA attendees interested in outreach to faith and justice communities are encouraged to participate, add to the discussion, or learn how to get involved in similar outreach.


OOS 7: Doing Justice Through Your Research: Following Your Passion and Creating a Just Society as an Ecologist
Tuesday, August 6, 2013: 8:00 AM-11:30 AM
101B, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Leanne M. Jablonski
Co-organizers: Carmen R. Cid and Megan M. Gregory
Moderator: Megan M. Gregory

Ecologists are making important contributions to environmental justice (EJ) through their places of work, research, education, and policy engagement. EJ is “the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies” (US-EPA). To facilitate citizen involvement in creating positive environmental and social change, ecologists increasingly employ community-based approaches to research and education. Engaging people in constructing and applying ecological knowledge can enhance citizens’ capacity to address environmental issues that affect quality of life, thus promoting EJ (Bryant and Callewaert, 2003). However, because participatory action research is not well-established in the natural sciences, ecologists often lack role models and institutional support for undertaking community-based research and its praxis of mutual engagement and ongoing reflection. To address these gaps, this session features stories of ecologists who have addressed justice concerns through research and education. Our goals are to (1) inspire and guide ecologists to engage in community-based research and education for justice and sustainability, and (2) contribute to dialogues about institutional change to support such work. This session will first outline traditions of scientists and academics engaging in society, and pose issues regarding the roles of ecologists and their research in the public sphere. We will feature established ecologists and emerging leaders who have addressed justice concerns in innovative ways. They are from diverse cultures (Asian, Black, Caucasian, Latinas) and work cross-culturally in urban, rural and indigenous settings. Two highlight ESA’s developments in addressing these themes, including SEEDS, WAMIE, and the EJ Section. Others will share stories of promoting EJ through undergraduate education, urban ecosystem research, and an international network to develop agro-ecological solutions to hunger and poverty. Speakers will also highlight trans-disciplinary collaborations that allow ecologists to address EJ issues in a holistic way through work with youth and community development programs, urban planners, and public health initiatives. This session builds on past EJ, diversity and mentoring initiatives and is part of several ESA 2013 meeting events helping participants link inspiration to action, including 1) a workshop for students and advisors, or other collaborators to develop research and outreach plans that integrate justice concerns and 2) a special session to review and provide input on the draft, “Ecologists’ Guide to Working with Communities,” an EJ section project. Wisdom and best practices will be distributed by print, electronic and social media.

8:00 AM OOS 7-1: Cultivating democracy and sustainability through collaborative ecological research, education, and action
Scott J. Peters, Imagining America / Syracuse University

8:20 AM OOS 7-2: Maximizing exposure of minority youths and communities to the wonders of ecological research
Carmen R. Cid, Eastern Connecticut State University

8:40 AM OOS 7-3: On privilege: Being, recognizing and expanding – MSIs, HBCUs, EJ, and ESA
George A. Middendorf, Howard University

9:00 AM OOS 7-4: Synergistic benefits to environmental justice in a couple’s ecological careers at a primarily undergraduate institution
Bob R. Pohlad, Ferrum College; Carolyn L. Thomas, Ferrum College

9:20 AM OOS 7-5: Beyond broader impacts: Finding venues and values that synergistically link academia and community
Nalini M. Nadkarni, University of Utah

9:40 AM OOS 7- Break

9:50 AM OOS 7-6: The responsibilities of ecologists: Reflections on my 30 years experience with the New World Agriculture and Ecology Group [NWAEG]
Ivette Perfecto, University of Michigan

10:10 AM OOS 7-7: Transforming cultural clashes to justice-science symbioses
Leanne M. Jablonski, Marianist Environmental Education Center

10:30 AM OOS 7-8: Designing collaborative inquiry for educational, environmental & social benefits: A case study of cover crop research with Brooklyn gardeners
Megan M. Gregory, Cornell University; Scott J. Peters, Imagining America / Syracuse University

10:50 AM OOS 7-9: Implementing K*: Choosing an optimum global carrying capacity for humans
Max F. Kummerow, Curtin University; Vicki J. Watson, University of Montana


SYMP 13: Can Ethics and Justice Pave a Sustainable Pathway for Human Ecosystems?
Wednesday, August 7, 2013: 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
M100EF, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer: Mimi E. Lam
Co-organizers: Catherine Gross and Charles H. Nilon
Moderator: Steward T.A. Pickett

Conflicts over the allocation of natural resources continue to be a pervasive societal problem, degrading ecosystems and human wellbeing: this compromises sustainable pathways for human ecosystems. Humanity’s unparalleled capacity to change ecosystems and alter the course of evolution originates from two propensities which Homo sapiens shares with all species, namely, occupying all accessible habitats and consuming all available resources. Humanity’s adaptability and innovation, through language, technology and culture, have allowed us to broaden our ecological niche, while undermining the negative feedback that would otherwise curb growth. But codes of ethics and justice are evolving to structure the use and management of shared resources. Ethics are the moral principles governing individual or group behavior, while justice relates to equity or fair distribution of benefits and harms. To advance sustainability science, ecologists can connect with social science research on ethics and justice and contextualize it within ecology. Rawls’ theory of ‘justice as fairness’ identifies a just society by just institutions and fully compliant behavior, while Sen’s comparative or realized justice approach examines what individuals do, as influenced by institutions and social interactions. If applied to natural resource management and policy, these approaches may reduce societal injustices and environmental damage, including resource inequities and scarcity induced by climate change. In this symposium, we explore whether human activities that preserve the rights and welfare of affected human communities and ecosystems can be not only ethical, but also sustainable. We introduce ecological and social science scholarship related to the theory, implementation, and evaluation of ethics and justice to examine the sustainability of diverse environmental resource allocation systems. The first speaker argues for a global ethical movement and highlights an initiative to close the gap between our understanding of the specter of global collapse and society’s failure to respond. The next two speakers explore the intersections between environmental justice and sustainability frameworks as they relate to environmental decision-making and risk assessment. The final three speakers examine diverse terrestrial and aquatic coupled human and natural systems, specifically agricultural, food and fisheries systems, which span local, national and global scales. These talks demonstrate that fairness issues need to be routinely addressed in all ecological and policy interventions, as they inherently involve value choices among complex trade-offs. The symposium concludes with a discussion on how to synthesize this research into a coherent framework and practical tools that can assess and implement more just and sustainable resource management and policies.

Endorsement: Environmental Justice Section, Traditional Ecological Knowledge Section Section, Agroecology Section, Human Ecology Section, Applied Ecology Section

1:30 PM SYMP 13-1: Is ethical revitalization the secret of avoiding collapse?
Paul R. Ehrlich, Stanford University

2:00 PM SYMP 13-2: Is environmental justice the missing link between ecology and sustainability science?
Charles H. Nilon, University of Missouri; George A. Middendorf, Howard University; Leanne M. Jablonski, University of Dayton

2:30 PM SYMP 13-3: Applying justice frameworks to environmental decision-making
Catherine Gross, Australian National University

3:00 PM SYMP 13- Break

3:10 PM SYMP 13-4: The need for action, ethics and values in ecology: Examples from food systems and conservation
M. Jahi Chappell, Washington State University Vancouver

3:40 PM SYMP 13-5: How can rights-based approaches to the food system contribute to sustainable and just decision-making?
Molly D. Anderson, College of the Atlantic

4:10 PM SYMP 13-6: Global fisheries: Can they be both ethical and sustainable?
Mimi E. Lam, University of British Columbia and University of New Mexico; Tony J. Pitcher, University of British Columbia

4:40 PM SYMP 13- Discussion